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Interface Force Measurement Solutions Featured in Quality Magazine

Choosing a force measurement device and getting the most out of it is a tricky process, even for the most seasoned engineers. So, when Quality Magazine asked our Chief Engineer and VP of Quality, Ken Vining, to share his knowledge of force measurement, he decided to put together a guide on what to look for in force measurement equipment and how to use and maintain your equipment properly.

In his Quality Magazine article titled, “Selecting and Using a Force Measurement Device: Everything you need to know,” Vining explains the contributing factors to force measurement device quality and accuracy, as well as a few tips and tricks to make sure you’re getting the best possible accuracy and longevity out of your device.

Included below is a brief introduction from article:

Force measurement devices like load cells, torque transducers and data acquisition devices are used across industries to design and test hardware. They’re a key factor in the product development process because the force, torque and weight data they collect helps to ensure products are accurately constructed, work as intended, are safe for use, and can withstand the test of time. In highly regulated and complex industries like medical and defense, this data becomes even more important because any miscalculation in the design of a product can put lives at risk.

The first thing to understand is every project requiring a load cell or torque transducer has different variables affecting accuracy and quality. And for every situation in product development and testing, there is a load cell to fit your precise need. Therefore, the most important step in ensuring accurate and high-quality data is speaking to a force measurement expert about the details of a project.

There are five key factors you need to know related to data accuracy, and three factors related to force measurement device quality. I’ll explain why each factor can contribute to inaccuracies and what to look for when selecting a device based on material selection, build quality, and environmental factors… READ MORE

Additional Ken Vining feature:

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For additional information on selecting and using your force measurement device, please contact our solutions experts.

Faces of Interface Featuring Chief Engineer Ken Vining

Throughout his career, Ken Vining has lived by the philosophy that if you don’t make mistakes, you will not learn. This approach has guided Ken to become the outstanding engineer and innovator he is today. It has also helped to shape his techniques as the head of the R&D team at Interface.

The number one thing I tell my team is that failure is the most important device we can use to learn and improve. I will never be upset if they spend money on an idea and it fails or doesn’t meet expectations. However, I will be unhappy with my team if they wish they had spent money to pursue an idea and didn’t because they were afraid to fail.” Ken Vining, Chief Engineer at Interface

Ken Vining’s career in force measurement began in 1981 when he took a position as a draftsman at Beowulf Corporation in Huntsville, Alabama. After a short time with the company, Ken decided he wanted to pursue a career in engineering because he thought he had the natural talent to excel in the profession. He began taking night classes in mechanical engineering at the University of Alabama.

Ken continued his career in force measurement while simultaneously expanding his education in mechanical engineering and the development and use of application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for force and pressure measurement products. His continuous pursuit of knowledge has allowed Ken to stay well-informed on current and future trends in mechanical engineering, electronics and force measurement.

In 2008, Ken joined Interface as a senior project engineer, a role he held for six years. He was later promoted to Director of Advanced Engineering where he developed and launched products for force, torque, and signal conditioning.

The technologies that Ken has been instrumental in producing leading-edge force measurement solutions including products made with bonded foil, semiconductor and sputtered thin film strain gages. Some of the most significant product launches that he has led or contributed to include Interface’s newest and biggest launch, the AxialTQ, and a product that is just about to launch, the 1923 wireless load cell.

Earlier this year, Ken was promoted to Chief Engineer at Interface. In this position, he oversees the R&D department and focuses on new product lines and capabilities that the company can explore. Ken’s relentless pursuit of education, personal growth and eye for innovation is what makes this role a natural fit.

Ken enjoys his new role at Interface because he knows that there are plenty of opportunities to fail, grow, and succeed in developing innovative products. The projects that get him most excited are those that give him the opportunity to blend basic load cell technology with high-end electronics – a process that Interface has a history at excelling in.

As for Ken’s free time activities, he’s an avid skier and bicyclist. He competes in a bicycle race or two per year, and his most recent ski trip brought him to the historic Telluride ski resort in Colorado.

To learn more about Interface’s innovative products, please visit www.interfaceforce.com.  If you would like to stay up with our latest products and new releases, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter InterfaceIQ. Click here to subscribe.