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Force Measurement Tips Related to Data Acquisition Systems

A data acquisition (DAQ) system consists of hardware and software components designed to collect, process, and analyze data from various sources and convert it into digital format for further analysis and storage. Based on the growing requirements to gather more data faster, Interface continues to add to our line of data acquisition systems to use with our load cells, torque transducers, and multi-axis sensors. These systems are designed for comprehensive force and torque measurement data collection and analysis.

Is more data, with easy integration and high accuracy, your objective? Working with our team of application engineers, we can assist you in pairing the best data acquisition system with your specific transducers. Considering the options, our team of experts offers these five essential bits of advice.

Data Acquisition Systems Tips for Test & Measurement

Select the Right Data Acquisition System

Choosing a data acquisition system compatible with your specific force measurement devices and application requirements is crucial. Consider factors such as sensor type, measurement range, accuracy, resolution, sampling rate (considering your over-sampling requirements), and connectivity options. In addition, the size and form factors can be critical to an application.

Proper Sensor Installation and Calibration

Proper sensor installation and calibration are critical for accurate force measurements. Follow the guidelines for sensor installation, including correct mounting, alignment, and wiring. Ensure that the load cell is calibrated according to established procedures and standards and that the calibration is regularly verified to maintain measurement accuracy. Proper sensor installation and calibration help eliminate potential sources of measurement errors.

Signal Conditioning and Filtering

Signal conditioning and filtering techniques are essential for optimizing the quality of the acquired force data. Signal conditioning involves amplification, offsets (zeroing), filtering, and linearization of the sensor output signal. Filtering techniques, such as anti-aliasing filters, IIR, or FIR, can help reduce noise and unwanted signals, ensuring accurate and reliable force measurements.

Data Validation and Analysis

Implement data validation techniques, such as range checking, outlier detection, and data integrity checks, to identify and correct potential data errors or anomalies. Analyze the acquired data using appropriate statistical and data analysis techniques to extract meaningful insights and make informed decisions based on the force measurement data. Be sure to select a force measurement device that is highly accurate and of superior quality.

System Maintenance and Calibration

Regular system maintenance, including sensor calibration and system validation, is crucial for reliable and accurate force measurements. Follow Interface’s recommendations for system maintenance, including sensor cleaning, inspection, and calibration intervals. Regular calibration and validation of the data acquisition system and force measurement devices help ensure the system remains accurate and reliable.

For additional information about Interface data acquisition solutions, watch the Unlocking the Power of DAQ webinar.

Popular Interface Data Acquisition Instruments

BX8 Data Acquisition Series

BX8-AS BlueDAQ Series Data Acquisition System with Industrial Enclosure

BX8-HD15 BlueDAQ Series Data Acquisition System for Discreet Sensors with Lab Enclosure

BX8-HD44 BlueDAQ Series Data Acquisition System for Multi-Axis Sensors with Lab Enclosure

Features & Benefits

  • 8-Channel synchronized sampling + TWO encoder/pulse channels
  • Strain gage, mV/V, ±10VDC, and PT1000 temperature inputs
  • Internal calculation of axis load values for 6-axis sensors
  • Active scaling of analog outputs according to internal calculations
  • ±5V, ±10V, 4-20mA, and 0-20 mA outputs
  • 48K samples/sec/channel, 24-bit internal resolution
  • USB connection to PC, Includes graphing and logging software
  • Excitation sense
  • Strain gage Full, 1/2, and 1/4 bridge, including bridge completion
  • TEDS compatible, ZERO button for 8-channel simultaneous tare, 16 digital I/O
  • Galvanic isolation: Analog input, analog output, digital I/O, USB
  • EtherCAT and CANbus/CANopen options
  • Enclosure Options

BSC4 Digital DAQ Model

BSC4D Multi-Channel Digital PC Interface and Data Acquisition Instrument

Features & Benefits

  • USB outputs
  • Four independent channels
  • For use with model 3AXX series 3-axis load cells
  • It can be used with up to any four standard load cells (with mV/V output)
  • mV/V, +/-5V, +/-10V, PT1000
  • Strain gage quarter/half and full bridges
  • 120, 350 & 1000 Ohm bridge completion
  • Limit frequency 450 Hz
  • Eight digital inputs/outputs

Use Cases for Data Acquisition Systems in Test & Measurement

Robotic Surgery Force Feedback using DAQ System

A biomechanical medical company wants to test its robotic arm’s force, torque, and tactile feedback for invasive surgery. The robotic arm mirrors the surgeon’s movements during surgery, and all haptic force feedback must be measured to ensure safety during invasive surgery. Several of Interface’s force and torque measurement products have been used on this robotic arm, including the ConvexBT Load Button Load Cell, SMTM Micro S-Type Load Cell, and the MRTP Miniature Overload Protected Flange Style Reaction Torque Transducer. Force results are collected when connected to the BX8 8-Channel Data Acquisition and Amplifier and viewed when attached to the laptop.

Material Tensile Testing using Data Acquisition Instrumentation

A customer wants to conduct a tensile force test on different samples and materials until failure. Materials include plastic, steel, or woven fabric. They want to measure tensile strength, yield strength, and yield stress. Interface’s 1200 Standard Precision LowProfile™ Load Cell is installed into the customer’s test frame. The tensile test is conducted, and force results captured by the load cell and extensometer are synced. These results can be displayed on a PC with supplied software.

Planetary Sample Collecting

As space exploration continues to grow and evolve, more robotic systems are created to collect samples of objects and materials on planetary surfaces. Robotic arms with sampling tools must be tested for scooping, drilling, and collecting samples. Interface’s Model 6A40 6-Axis Load Cell can be installed between the flange and the sample collecting tool. When connected to the BX8-HD44 Data Acquisition, the customer can receive force and torque measurements when connected to their control system using BlueDAQ software. Interface’s 6A40-6 Axis Load Cell could measure all forces and torques (Fx, Fʏ, Fz, Mx, Mʏ, Mz.) The BXB-HD44 Data Acquisition could log, display, and graph measurements while sending scaled analog output signals for these axes to the customer’s robot control system.

Learn more about your DAQ system options using Interface’s Data AQ Packs Guide.

Force Measurement is Fundamental in Material Testing

Material tests are run to determine the quality, durability, and resistance of materials for parts and products. Selecting the right material is critical to performance of a product, system, or part, especially as it relates to the environmental factors. It is also core for adhering to regulatory standards and compliance requirements.

Whether it is construction and concrete materials, metals, fabrics, biomaterial, plastics, packaging, or some other matter, material testing is fundamental throughout the entire development lifecycle.

Among the various ways to test materials, force measurement is one of the most important. Common uses of force measurement in material tests include applications to measure hardness, torsion, strength, compression, bending, shear, impact, creep, fatigue, and nondestructive capabilities.

The use of load cells provides an adaptable tool that can be utilized for various types of material tests. Using force measurement sensors help to detect changes in load, which is used to determine the flexibility, strength, or weakness of properties in materials. This is critical for research and quality control.

For example, in metal material testing load cells are frequently used for characterizing and assessing the quality of metallic components and structures. Material test engineers use load cells to accurately measure the tensile strength, compression resistance, and yield properties of metal samples. By subjecting metals to controlled loads and monitoring the metals deformation during tests, Interface load cells provide critical data that informs engineering decisions and quality control processes. Material tests confirm that the metals chosen for products like aircraft structures, automotive components, and sports equipment, meet stringent performance standards. The measurement sensors are also vital for determining the reliability, longevity and safety of metal materials used for any product or part. See other examples of testing in our new Interface T&M Material Testing Overview.

It is the responsibility of a material testing engineer to determine the resilience, safety, and value of materials through mechanical testing, of which material testing is one of the five categories. Ultimately, product designers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) rely upon material testing data to ensure their products can withstand the anticipated levels of force during use. They also need to know if the material will stretch or elongate, as well as pinpoint its exact breaking point.

Interface’s robust line of load cells, multi-axis sensors, and data acquisition systems are used for material testing. It is common to have our 1200 LowProfile load cells installed into material testing machines at test labs and onsite. We also supply a variety of miniature load cells and load pins for material testing, depending on the type of equipment and environment used for tests.

High accuracy load cells are essential in material testing due to their precision, versatility, and ability to provide real-time data, which helps researchers and engineers gain a better understanding of a material’s mechanical properties and behavior under different conditions.

If force must be measured, Interface has a solution. This applies to testing materials used for infrastructure, medical devices, aircraft, rockets, vehicles, robotics and consumer goods. As new materials and composites are introduced in revolutionary ways for use in construction, designing light weight products using polymers, and 3D printed components, it is imperative that material tests validate the use case based on high accuracy measurements.

Our force measurement products are being used to gather data from testing materials in applications used for machines, equipment, structures, packaging and more. Here are a few examples of material testing applications.

Inflatable Space Habitat

Inflatable habitats are the newest innovation in the space industry, creating a new interplanetary dwelling for humans to live and work past the Earth’s atmosphere. An innovative space industry company wanted to test the overall design and material of their inflatable habitats by conducting a burst test. Multiple clevises and LP Stainless Steel Load Pins were attached to the in the webbing material that create the inflatable habitat. When pressure was increased within the inflatable habitat, the load pins captured how much force the heavy duty material will hold at specific pressures until it explodes. Interface’s LP Stainless Steel Load Pins successfully measured the amount of force the inflatable habitat could withstand during the burst test.

Material Tensile Testing Load Frame

A customer wanted to conduct a tensile force test on different samples and materials until failure. Materials include plastic, steel, or woven fabric. They wanted to measure tensile strength, yield strength, and yield stress. Interface’s 1200 Standard Precision LowProfile™ Load Cell was installed into the customer’s test frame. The tensile test was conducted, and force results were captured by the load cell and extensometer were synced through the SI-USB4 4 Channel USB Interface Module. These results were then displayed on the customer’s PC with supplied software. With Interface’s force products, the customer was able to determine the tensile strength, yield strength, and yield stress of a variety of different materials.

Material testing is often the first step in any new product development process. With Interface force measurement solutions, our customers can expect industry-leading accuracy, quality and reliability in testing the materials that will go into their next project. Contact us for products used for various test types.

Interface Solutions for Material Testing Engineers

Tensile Testing for 3D Materials

Bending Beam Load Cell Basics

The Aviation Industry Soars Using Interface Solutions

Interface Solutions for Structural Testing

Interface Solutions Aid Pharmaceutical Industry

Engineered Solutions for Lifting Webinar

Interface’s technical webinar Engineered Solutions for Lifting details measurement devices used in lifting equipment, machines, and vehicles to improve operations and safety. Interface load cells and instrumentation are used to operate cranes, hoist heavy objects, and measure forces in infrastructure projects. Interface experts answer how load cells are used in safety monitoring for lifting equipment. Learn about Interface sensor products suited for integration into existing equipment and test and measurement projects.

Demystifying Specifications Webinar

Interface’s technical force measurement webinar Demystifying Specifications details descriptions, terms, values and parameters found in product datasheets for load cells, torque transducers, instrumentation and specialty products. Learn from our experts what specifications need critical review, recommendations based on product categories, and the insider point of view on what is most important in terms of specifications for different use cases and tests.

Understanding GUM and Measurement Uncertainty

Understanding GUM and adherence to good test and measurement practices are essential to minimize uncertainties and ensure reliable measurement results for every application.

In the context of test and measurement, GUM stands for Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. The GUM is a widely recognized and internationally accepted document published by the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology (JCGM), which provides guidelines for evaluating and expressing uncertainties in measurement results.

GUM establishes general rules for evaluating and expressing uncertainty in measurement that are intended to be applicable to a broad spectrum of measurements. A critical portion of any measurement process, the GUM outlines a thorough framework for uncertainty estimation. GUM defines terms and concepts related to uncertainty, describes methods for uncertainty calculation, and offers guidance for reporting and the documentation of uncertainties in measurement results.

The GUM provides a systematic approach to assess and quantify uncertainties by source, including equipment constraints, environmental conditions, calibration procedures, and human factors. The standards set by GUM emphasizes the need for considering and quantifying all substantial uncertainty components to ensure reliable and traceable measurement results.

By following the principles and guidelines outlined in the GUM, test and measurement professionals, metrologists, and scientists ensure standardized approach to uncertainty evaluation and reporting, facilitating comparability and consistency of measurement results across different laboratories and industries.

The uncertainty requirement varies for different use cases and industry applications. For example, for aerospace, defense, and medical devices there are strict uncertainty requirements compared to commercial scales or measurement tests that do not need precision accuracy.

When estimating uncertainty in load cell calibration, it is important to refer to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The GUM provides a comprehensive framework with general rules for evaluating and expressing uncertainty in measurement. It serves as a guide applicable to a wide range of measurements, providing valuable guidance on uncertainty assessment in load cell calibration and other measurement processes.

In test labs that utilize load cells and torque transducers, the principles and guidelines GUM should be consistently applied to accurately evaluate and express uncertainties associated with the measurements obtained from these devices.

The application of GUM in test labs using load cells and torque transducers requires a thorough understanding of the measurement process, relevant standards, and calibration procedures. Read Understanding Uncertainty in Load Cell Calibration for more information.

Different considerations to measure uncertainty

  • Determine what parameter is to be measured and the units of measure.
  • Identify the components of the calibration process and the accompanying sources of error.
  • Write an expression for the uncertainty of each source of error.
  • Determine the probability distribution for each source of error.
  • Calculate a standard uncertainty for each source of error for the range or value of interest.
  • Construct an uncertainty budget that lists all the components and their standard uncertainty calculations
  • Combine the standard uncertainty calculations and apply a coverage factor to obtain the final expanded uncertainty.

GUM is used to identify and characterize uncertainty sources that can affect the measurements obtained from load cells and torque transducers. These sources may include calibration uncertainties, environmental conditions, electrical noise, stability of the test setup, and other relevant factors. Each of these sources should be quantified and considered in the uncertainty analysis.

Quantitative estimates of uncertainty component contributions to the overall uncertainty need to be determined. This can involve conducting experiments, performing calibration procedures, analyzing historical data, or utilizing manufacturer specifications to obtain uncertainty values for each component.

Once sources and estimates are complete, next step is to combine the individual uncertainty components using appropriate mathematical methods prescribed by the GUM. These methods include root-sum-of-squares (RSS), statistical analysis, and other relevant techniques. The aim is to obtain an overall estimate of uncertainty that accounts for the combined effects of all relevant sources.

The GUM provides guidelines on expressing uncertainties in measurement results. It emphasizes the use of confidence intervals, expanded uncertainty, and coverage factors. The uncertainty should be reported alongside the measurement values, indicating the level of confidence associated with the measurement. This allows the users of the measurement data to understand the reliability and accuracy of the obtained results.

For additional information about GUM, errors and setting an uncertainty budget, watch our webinar Accurate Report on Calibration. The video is set to start on the topic of Measurement Uncertainty.

It is essential to consider the specific uncertainty requirement of the application to ensure that the chosen force measurement device is appropriately calibrated for the project. This resource is a helpful recap: Specifying Accuracy Requirements When Selecting Load Cells.

In addition, understanding GUM, reducing uncertainty with regular calibration of testing devices and proper maintenance of the equipment go together with GUM.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Gold Standard® Calibration System

Accurate Report on Calibration

Technical Information

Load Cell Test Protocols and Calibrations

Regular Calibration Service Maintains Load Cell Accuracy

 

Unlocking the Power of DAQ Webinar Recap

Interface hosted a technical seminar on the topic of data acquisition systems. With the demands for more data and faster processing with requirements to connect multiple devices in testing environments, there is an increasing need for high accuracy DAQ systems. Keith Skidmore and Dave Reardon detail the basics of DAQ, trends, products, software options and answer to questions in the webinar, Unlocking the Power of DAQ.

To start, a data acquisition (DAQ) system consists of hardware and software components designed to collect, process, and analyze data from various sources and convert it into digital format for further analysis and storage.

Components of DAQ Systems

  • Input:  Sensors (Ex: Force, Torque), Digital Signals (Ex: DIO, Counters), Timing Signals (Ex: IRIG, GPS) and Serial Streams (Ex: RS-232, RS-422)
  • Signal Conditioning Circuitry: Excitation, Amplifier, Voltage Offsets, and Filters
  • Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC)
  • Digital-to-Analog Converters (DAC)
  • Hardware and Software for processing, analyzing, display and recording
  • Output Signal: prior to ADC, after DAC, or even after processing

Analog data acquisition systems acquire and process analog signals. Analog signals can include sensors that measure load, force, torque, strain, temperature, pressure, voltage, current, and many other physical or electrical qualities.  Digital data acquisition systems acquire and process digital signals. Digital signals can include on and off states, counters, serial streams, text data, video, GPS signals, and other advanced options.

 Key Considerations for DAQ Systems

  • Features
    • Supported range of inputs mV/V, VDC, mA, partial bridge, encoder, pulse, frequency
    • Included software and related functionality
  • Form factor
    • Bench top, rack mount, portable, ruggedized and others
  • Sample rate
  • Connectivity
  • Power supply
  • Channel count and cost per channel

Interface DAQ Products

Interface offers a range of solutions for DAQ systems. The top products for DAQ include:

During the webinar, Keith and Dave detail a series of product groups for the Interface Data AQ Packs.

Data AQ Pack Brochure

Watch the webinar and learn more about product options, software, applications and best practice tips.

Testing Labs Choose Interface High Accuracy Products

Specialists focused on testing applications work in a variety of testing lab environments. In each lab, technicians rely on the tools to collect and report on data that is used to make products safer, guarantee performance, ensure quality, and to meet the strict industry standards and requirements. Accuracy in testing data is dependent on the precision measurement devices and instrumentation used to capture the results.

We supply lab engineers with high-accuracy sensor technologies used to complete rigid test requirements. Interface is the top provider of test and measurement products used for structural and material testing, static and fatigue testing, torsion effects, tension tests, calibration testing, and environmental testing. Read more in Types of Force Measurement Tests 101.

Our standard high precision load cells, torque transducers, multi-axis sensors, and instrumentation are used on every continent for T&M. Based on our quality and performance, we are the chosen supplier to calibration and testing labs. We see our products used today for continuous improvement programs, advancements in smart manufacturing and new product designs.

If it must be measured, Interface has a solution. Our products are designed for small and large testing facilities, including calibration-grade load cells, load frames and test stands, along with data acquisition systems. The wide variety of our force measurement solutions designed for testing labs means we play a role in every industry that is making a physical product and the test labs that validates the products performance.

Testing Labs and Types of Testing Using Interface Solutions

General Automotive Test Labs:

  • Component and Sub-Component Level Testing
  • Suspension Testing
  • EV Battery Testing

Automotive Driveline Testing:

  • Engine Performance and Durability Tests
  • Motor Efficiency Testing
  • Power Analyzation (Electric)

Aerospace Testing:

  • Full Scale Structural Static Testing
  • Component Fatigue Test
  • High Precision Thrust Testing
  • Simulators
  • Wind Tunnel Testing

Geotechnical and Civil Testing

  • Concrete or Asphalt Core Testing
  • Soils Testing

General Structural and Component Testing

  • General Push and Pull
  • Design Proofing
  • Life Cycle Fatigue Validation

Medical Device Testing:

  • Prototyping
  • PPAP Validation and FDA Certification
  • Device Lifecycle Testing

Consumer Product Testing Labs:

  • Design Validation
  • Material Testing
  • Fatigue and Failure Tests

Interface recently highlighted testing lab applications in our Test Lab Essentials Webinar. Here you can see the lab use cases and products as they are reviewed by our applications experts.

Each of these testing types requires different force testing equipment, and our experts work directly with testing lab professionals to determine the products or systems they need for single and ongoing test requirements.

As testing technologies becomes increasingly complex, off-the-shelf products may not meet the needs of every Interface customer. We lend engineers expertise in test and measurement to support unique and custom requirements to get the right sensor, instrument, and system in place.

Since our first load cells were designed five decades ago, we have built millions upon millions of load cells and torque transducers used in testing labs around the world. Our products are built to withstand the rigor and requirements needed for high quality and reliable data collection in test and measurement. Our test customers depend on us for proving accuracy, consistency, and reliability in performance.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Interface and Testing Lab Applications

Testing Lab Essentials Webinar

Engine Dynamometer App Note

Consumer Product Testing Case Study

Interface Solutions for Safety and Regulation Testing and Monitoring

Metrologists and Calibration Technicians 101

Motor Test Stand

GS-SYS04 Gold Standard® Portable E4 Machine Calibration System

Electric Vehicle Structural Battery Testing

Furniture Fatigue Cycle Testing App Note

Regular Calibration Service Maintains Load Cell Accuracy

 

Interface and Testing Lab Applications

Test and measurement impacts nearly every industry.  At Interface, we classify Test and Measurement (T&M) as it’s own solutions market. Though testing is generally a service, the accuracy and quality equipment and tools that are required for performing these T&M services has created an industry in itself.

Throughout the Test and Measurement industry, there are several different classifications and testing lab types. Each of these different testing labs provide unique equipment for different forms of testing depending on the application, system or component. These different types test labs include:

  • Structural testing labs perform tensile, compression, bending, fatigue and hardness testing on materials, components, or assemblies.
  • Environmental testing labs evaluate the impact of environmental factors on products, components, or materials performing temperature, humidity, salt spray, and vibration testing.
  • Electrical testing labs determine the electrical properties of components or products using insulation resistance, electrical continuity, and dielectric strength testing.
  • Chemical testing labs determine the composition and purity of materials using chromatography, spectroscopy, and elemental analysis.
  • Product safety testing labs ensure that products meet safety and regulatory standards with flammability, toxicity, and durability testing.
  • Calibration testing labs ensure that measuring instruments and equipment are accurate and reliable. Common disciplines include force, torque, pressure, temperature and physical calibration. Read more: Interface Calibration 101
  • Non-destructive testing labs evaluate the integrity of materials with ultrasonic testing, magnetic particle inspection, and radiography.

Here at Interface, we are deeply ingrained in supplying nearly every type of testing lab out there with precision T&M devices, from the world’s best force measurement sensors to advanced instrumentation. Interface offers one of the most diverse force, torque, and weight related force sensor product lines in the market. It is why labs prefer Interface. In addition to our expanding line of  data acquisition systems, software and accessories, T&M engineers and lab pros find Interface as a one-stop-shop for simple and complex testing projects.

Testing Lab Applications Using Interface Products

Material Testing Lab – Press Form Monitoring

Customer Challenge: Press forming is a method to deform different materials. A force measurement solution is required to monitor the forces being applied by the press forming machine to ensure quality control and traceability during the production process.

Interface Solution: For large press forming machines, Interface recommended installing the 1000 High Capacity Fatigue-Rated LowProfile™ Load Cell. When the material was placed under the punch plate to form a shape, the force applied was measured and results were sent to the INF-USB3 Universal Serial Bus Single Channel PC Interface Module, where results can be graphed and logged.  Read: Press Forming and Load Monitoring

Medical Testing Lab – Specimen Research Linear Test Stand

Customer Challenge: Medical experts need the best equipment during research of multiple specimens. In this case, a medical researcher needed to monitor the load force of their linear actuator that uses a needle to collect material from the desired specimen.

Interface Solution; Interface’s SuperSC S-Type Miniature Load Cell was easily installed into the linear test stand. A needle with a gripper on the end was installed on the lower end of the SuperSC. As the needle is pushed to collect material of the specimen, the load feedback is captured using the 9330 Battery Powered High Speed Data Logging Indicator.  Read: Specimen Research App Note

Safety Test Facility – Bike Helmet Impact Test

Customer Challenge: A company wanted to test the impact of a bike helmet when dropped from different heights, onto a flat surface such as an anvil. This test is necessary to ensure consumer safety, and that their products are made of the highest quality until sold to the public.

Interface Solution: Interface suggested installing our 1101 Compression Only Ultra Precision LowProfile™ Load Cell at the bottom of an anvil. The bike helmet was then dropped from multiple heights, at multiple angles, onto the anvil. The measurements from impact were then recorded and logged using our INF-USB3 Interface Module.  Read: CPG Bike Helmet Impact Test

Product Test Lab – Touch Screen Force Testing

Customer Challenge: Touchscreen kiosks used in restaurants, retail and entertainment venues all need various tests to be performed to ensure functionality and sensitivity. One of those tests are force tests that touch screens to withstand high use by all types of consumers.

Interface Solution: Interface’s SMTM Micro S-Type Load Cell was installed on the customer’s force testing machine. The touchscreen was laid flat under the machine, and force tests were conducted in different locations of the touchscreen. With supplied BlueDAQ software, results are captured and reviewed using the 9330 Battery Powered High Speed Data Logging Indicator through an SD card.

These are just a few examples of where Interface products are involved in a wide variety of different testing labs and how T&M engineers are utilizing them. To learn more, check out our new Testing Lab Essentials webinar, which can be found here.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Testing Lab Essentials Webinar Recap

Introducing the Interface Consumer Product Testing Case Study

Interface Solutions for Safety and Regulation Testing and Monitoring

Electric Vehicle Structural Battery Testing

 

Unlocking the Power of DAQ Webinar

Interface webinar Unlocking the Power of DAQ details trends, best practices and considerations for using data acquisiton in force measurement applications. We explore DAQ instrumentation options, trends and set-up options. Learn why data acquisition systems are growing in popularity for all types of use cases. We also detail the new Interface Data AQ Packs and system options for capturing critical data. Watch the online technical seminar for recommendations on equipment, plus we answser the most frequently asked questions about DAQ in test and measurement.