Posts

Outlining Force Solutions for Structural Outrigging

Across a wide variety of industries, heavy machinery, maritime, construction, and other infrastructure often need additional structural support. This includes support that prevents equipment, vessels, and buildings from falling over, capsizing or collapsing.

Typically, the solution to provide this critical structural support comes in the form of an outrigger. For vehicles, both land and maritime, an outrigger is a projecting structure, with specific meaning depending on types of vessels, or the legs on a wheeled vehicle that are folded out when it needs stabilization.

For buildings, outriggers are interior lateral structural systems provided to improve the overturning stiffness and strength of high-rise buildings. It is a lateral load resisting system that is located within the building. The whole system consists of a core structure connected to the perimeter columns of the building.

These types of structural supports became popularized in the 1980s as an addition to high-rise buildings as they are effective up to 150 floors due to its unique combination of architectural flexibility and structural efficiency. Outrigging has been adapted for large vehicles and boats, such as large cranes that are extremely top heavy and can create balance problems, or yachts that need to be stabilized when stored out of water.

With the addition of these supports, various forms of testing need to be done to ensure the outrigger can support the vehicle or structure it is installed upon. This is where Interface’s force measurement testing and monitoring products are utilized in different outrigging applications.

Interface load cells are used by outrigging engineers, civil engineers and heavy equipment manufacturers, oil and gas, construction industry and marine equipment companies. Read more why Rigging Engineers Choose Interface Measurement Solutions.

The role of force measurement sensor technologies in outrigging is to provide high accuracy measurement of the outrigging equipment in test and actual use. The applications range from integration of sensors into outrigger equipment, to load cells for real-time monitoring of the physical structure using outrigger supports.

The most common Interface products used for outrigging include:

For example, Interface load shackle cells are used to measure the forces during outrigger testing as well as on the outrigger equipment that support the structure. The data from the sensor is critical information used to assess the structural integrity of the outrigger or structure and to identify any potential weaknesses.

Interface load cells, such as our load shackles or load pins, are typically placed in strategic locations on the outrigger or structure where the force is expected to be greatest. The load cell is then connected to a data acquisition system (DAQ) or indicator that records the force readings. The data can then be analyzed to determine the maximum force applied to the outrigger or structure, as well as the distribution of force over the structure.

Load cells can also be used to monitor the performance of outriggers or structures over time. This can be helpful in identifying any changes in the structural integrity that may be caused by wear and tear, environmental factors, or other factors. Utilizing instrumentation with alarm capabilities is helpful, as well as a tool for maintenance.

Load cells are an important safety feature in outrigging equipment. They can help to prevent accidents and ensure that the equipment is used safely. A load cell is used to prevent a crane collapse during the construction of a high-rise building in a large congested metropolitan city. The crane is used for lifting a heavy beam. The load cell alerts the operator when the load is too heavy.

Ultimately, force measurement provides several benefits to testing and monitoring different outrigger applications, including:

  • Increased safety: By measuring the force applied to the outrigger, a load cell can help to prevent overloading and damage to the outrigger. It is also valuable for continuous monitoring during lifting use cases, such as with a crane or heavy machinery.
  • Improved efficiency: By monitoring the performance of the outrigger, a load cell can help to identify any potential problems early on, which can help to prevent costly downtime.
  • Reduced risk: By providing accurate data on the force applied to the outrigger, a load cell can help to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.

Examples of how force measurement is used to test outrigger solutions in a variety of industries:

  • In the oil and gas industry, load cells are used to test the outriggers of offshore drilling rigs. This helps to ensure that the rigs are safe to operate in high-wind and wave conditions.
  • In the construction industry, load cells are used to test the outriggers of cranes and other lifting equipment. This helps to ensure that the equipment is safe to use and that it will not overload the outriggers.
  • In civil engineering, load cells are used to test the structural integrity of bridges and other structures. This helps to ensure that the structures are safe to use and that they will not collapse underload.

Outriggers play a critical role in the safety and support of vehicles, infrastructure projects and massive structures. Interface force measurement products also play a necessary role in safeguarding outriggers and the operators. If you have an outrigging use case and are wondering which products are best suiting for your specific requirements, contact Interface Application Engineers for help.

Construction Brochure

Engineered Solutions for Lifting Webinar

Interface’s technical webinar Engineered Solutions for Lifting details measurement devices used in lifting equipment, machines, and vehicles to improve operations. Interface load cells and instrumentation are used in operating cranes, for hoisting heavy objects, and measuring forces in infrastructure projects. Interface experts will provide answers as to how load cells are used in safety monitoring for lifting equipment. Learn about Interface sensor products suited for integration into existing equipment, as well as for test and measurement projects.

Interface Solutions for Heavy Equipment

Interface has collaborated with heavy equipment design engineers and OEMs for many years by providing sensors to measure weight, torque, and force. Heavy equipment, also known as heavy machinery, is used to describe the heavy-duty machines that are vastly utilized in infrastructure, construction, transportation, maritime, forestry, agriculture, and mining industries.

Force measurement plays a crucial role in the design, testing, and use of heavy equipment and vehicles including excavators, bulldozers, loaders, cranes, lifts, mixers, pavers, and compactors. Many of the considerations in designing heavy machinery are mandated by force limitations and equipment performance testing. Reference our Cranes and Lifting case study for examples.

Top Five Heavy Equipment Use Cases for Force Measurement

  1. Performance Valuation: Force measurement is used to evaluate the performance of heavy equipment. It allows engineers and designers to assess the forces and loads experienced by different components, such as hydraulic systems, structural elements, and moving parts. Measuring forces with high accuracy ensures that the equipment is built to operate within safe and efficient limits.
  2. Safety Confidence: Heavy equipment operates in demanding and challenging environments where safety is fundamental. Force measurement solutions from Interface help to identify potential safety risks by monitoring the forces exerted on various components in both testing and actual real-time use. Load cells and other sensor technologies enable engineers to design equipment with appropriate safety factors, ensuring that it can withstand the expected forces without failure or compromising operator safety.
  3. Design Optimization: Force measurement assists engineers to enhance the design of heavy equipment. By accurately measuring forces and loads during operation, and will identify areas of high stress or potential weak points. This information is valuable in refining the design, selecting appropriate materials, and implementing structural modifications to improve durability, efficiency, and overall performance.
  4. Regulatory Standards and Compliance: Heavy equipment is subject to strict industry standards and regulations, globally, nationally, and locally that specify performance and safety requirements. Force measurement is used for measuring and monitoring compliance. By accurately measuring and documenting forces, engineers can demonstrate that the equipment meets the specified criteria, aiding in regulatory approvals and certifications.
  5. Troubleshooting and Maintenance: Periodically measuring forces to monitor the condition of critical components and identify any abnormal or excessive forces is useful for identifying issues or wear. This information is critical for preventive maintenance, identifying the root causes of problems, and extending the equipment’s lifespan.

In the construction industry, heavy equipment is extensively used for retail, commercial and civic construction projects. Interface supplies load cells, tension links, load shackles, load pins and other measurement solutions for testing and monitoring.

Excavators are equipped with a hydraulic arm and a bucket, allowing them to dig, excavate, and move enormous amounts of earth, debris, or materials. Sensors are used in design, performance monitoring and maintenance of this type of machinery.

Loaders are powerful machines used for loading materials onto trucks, stockpiling, and general material handling. Overloading is the most common failure. Testing loads for these machines used in construction sites, quarries, and mining operations ensures safety and compliance.

Bulldozers need to be evaluated for earthmoving and grading projects. Rigorous force measurement evaluations help to validate power and maneuverability.

Cranes extensively utilize sensors, including load pins and tension links. During crane lifting capacity tests, force sensors are used to verify if a design for the crane can handle the loads it is required to lift and carry while in movement. This can be done with a variety of different force sensors. Interface tension link sensors are a smart choice as it can be used inbetween the crane hook and the load to provide a more accurate reading on the force. This example of force testing is critical to not only moving the required load, but also in verifying that the crane is safe to operate around workers below. If the crane lift capacity cannot be verified, individuals below the crane are at risk of massive loads dropping from great heights.

Lifts depend on sensors. In the shipping and transportation industry, heavy equipment must have carrying capacities verified or the machines and vehicles may break down or lose control due to excessive loading. In addition, operators need to be cognizant of their load limits and current use in cases. This verification is done using load cells in the testing of the vehicle, but load cells are also used at truck stops with weigh stations. Interface load cells can provide fully accurate data at extremely high weight. In addition, the engines on these trucks need to be able to move the vehicle while under large loads. For this challenge, torque transducers can be used to evaluate and refine an engine’s capability to move vehicles at required loads.

Interface sensors are used in the test and monitoring of maritime heavy equipment, both onshore and near-shore. Cranes and forklifts used in moving cargo plus maritime equipment used for securing lines often use sensor technologies. We also supply measurement devices used for heavy equipment that is submersible. This includes engine testing, mooring and fishing lines, boat hoists and more. Interface offers a complete lineup of sealed sensors that excel while submerged, allowing maritime users to test equipment in real time.

Included below, we have outlined a few heavy machinery testing examples in which Interface products were used:

Gantry Crane Weighing

Gantry cranes are used for several mobile and lifting applications within industrial or construction environments. A weighing system is needed to see if the gantry crane can manage lifting heavy containers or loads, preventing crane failure or accidents. Interface’s WTSLP Wireless Stainless Steel Load Pins can be installed into the corners of the lifting mechanism of the gantry crane, where heavy loaded containers are lifted and moved. The force results are then wireless transmitted to both the WTS-BS-1-HS Wireless Handheld Display for Single Transmitters, or directly to the customer’s PC with the WTS-BS-6 Wireless Telemetry Dongle Base Station. Using this solution, a customer can monitor the loads lifted from their gantry crane with Interface’s Wireless Telemetry System and determine whether their gantry crane was able to manage lifting heavy loads.

Overall, force measurement provides valuable insights into the performance, safety, and reliability of heavy equipment, enabling designers, manufacturers, and operators to make informed decisions and ensure efficient and safe operation.

We have a wide range of solutions for the design and testing challenges of heavy equipment used for lifting, weighing, and measuring force and torque. Contact us for any help you need with heavy equipment solutions.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Infrastructure Projects Rely on Interface

Lifting Solutions

Weighing Solutions Brochure

Heavy Truck Test and Measurement Solutions

Force Measurement Solutions for the Construction Industry

Bridge Construction Wind Monitoring

Solutions to Advance Agriculture Smart Farming and Equipment

Why Machine and Equipment Manufacturers Choose Interface

LIFTING: Lifting Heavy Objects

LIFTING: Crane Block Safety Check

LIFTING: Crane Force Regulation

Rigging Engineers Choose Interface Measurement Solutions

Interface supports rigging engineers who design, plan, and oversee the rigging of heavy loads by providing high accuracy measurement solutions. Rigging is the process of using ropes, chains, and other lifting equipment to move and position large objects.

Rigging engineers typically work in maritime, construction, manufacturing, entertainment and energy industries. Interface is also seeing a growing demand for sensor technologies used by rigging engineers that work in aerospace, both for aircraft and space vehicle manufacturers.

The use of load cells to measure the weight of heavy loads, such as cranes, ships, rockets, theater equipment and machinery is on the rise. Rigging engineers use the data from load cells, load pins, load shackles, and tension links to ensure that the loads are not overloaded and that the rigging systems are properly designed for each use case. This often requires pairing the high accuracy sensor with instrumentation. For versatility wireless telemetry systems are useful for rigging engineers.

These vital engineering positions are responsible for rigging up and down cranes, loading and unloading ships, or moving heavy equipment around a factory floor. Rigging engineers that design and plan rigging systems for lifting and transporting heavy loads across various industries rely on accurate measurement data. They often oversee the rigging of heavy loads, ensuring that it is done safely and efficiently. They inspect rigging equipment for wear and tear, and make repairs as needed while maintaining records of rigging operations. Sensors and instrumentation play an important role.

Load cells are an important tool for rigging engineers. They provide valuable information that can be used to ensure the safety of rigging operations, whether they are for mooring tension tests in the maritime industry or for lifting an aircraft for wind tunnel testing. Load cells can be used in a variety of ways by rigging engineers. For example, they can be used to:

  • Monitor the weight of a load in real time. This information can be used to make sure that the load does not exceed the safe lifting capacity of the rigging system. Sensors are often integrated into conveyor systems, hoppers, and other equipment to measure the weight or force being exerted. These devices are often used in industries like mining, agriculture, and manufacturing.
  • Create a load map. A load map is a visual representation of the weight distribution of a load. This information can be used to ensure that the load is evenly distributed, and that the rigging system is properly designed no matter the size of structure or component.
  • Set overload limits. Overload limits are set to prevent the rigging system from being overloaded. If the weight of a load exceeds the overload limit, an alarm will sound, and the rigging system will be shut down.
  • Record load data. Load data can be recorded and used to track the weight of loads over time. This information can be used to identify trends and patterns that may indicate a need for maintenance or repairs.
  • Secure equipment. The information from force and weight sensors is critical when lifting and securing equipment, such as appartus used in the entertainment sector, from arial arts rigging to stage set-up.

Rigging engineers use load pins, load shackles, and tension links in a variety of applications to measure and monitor loads, weight and tensions in different lifting and rigging operations.

  • Crane and Hoist Monitoring: Load pins, load shackles, and tension links are commonly used in cranes and hoists to measure the load being lifted. These devices can be integrated into the lifting mechanism to provide real-time load monitoring, ensuring that the load remains within safe working limits. Application examples: Gantry Crane Weighing and Crane Force Regulation App Note
  • Heavy Lifting and Rigging: Load measurement technologies are used in heavy lifting and rigging operations to measure the tension in cables, ropes, and other lifting components. By monitoring the tension, rigging engineers can ensure that the load is evenly distributed, and that the lifting equipment is not overloaded. Application examples: Lifting Heavy Objects and Aircraft Lifting Equipment
  • Load Testing: Sensors are utilized in load testing scenarios to assess the strength and performance of lifting equipment, such as cranes, hoists, and winches. These devices provide accurate load measurements during the testing process, helping engineers determine if the equipment meets the required safety standards. Application examples: Rescue Helicopter Hoist Test and Harness Durability Testing
  • Offshore and Marine Applications: Due to the ruggedized designs of Interface load pins, load shackles, and tension links, we see extensive use in offshore and maritime operations. They are employed in various lifting and mooring applications, including lifting heavy equipment onto offshore platforms, measuring tension in mooring lines, and monitoring loads on anchor systems. Application examples: Mooring Line Tension Testing App Note and Maritime Measurement Solutions for Onshore and Submersible Applications
  • Infrastructure and Civil Engineering Projects: Load cells, load pins, load shackles, and tension links are actively used in construction and civil engineering projects for load monitoring purposes. They can be used in applications such as measuring loads on temporary structures, monitoring tension in cables and suspension systems, and ensuring safe load distribution during construction operations. Application examples: Power Line Tension Testing and Monitoring the Seismic Force of a Suspension Bridge

In all these applications, rigging engineers are using crucial data about loads, tensions, and forces, to ensure safety, optimize performance, and prevent equipment failures.

Load cells and measurement solutions can help to prevent overloading of rigging systems, which can lead to accidents and injuries. Accurate sensors help to improve the efficiency of rigging operations by providing real-time weight data. This information can be used to adjust the rigging system as needed, which can help to reduce the amount of time and effort required to lift and transport heavy loads.

Learn more about Interface’s Lifting Solutions and Weighing Solutions for Rigging Engineers with these resources:

Aerial Arts Rig

Theater Rigging System

WTS Yacht Rigging Inspection App Note

Bridge Construction Wind Monitoring

Aircraft Engine Hoist

Innovative Interface Lifting Solutions

Aerial Lift Overload Control

Weighing: Gantry Crane Weighing

Crane Safety Requires Precision Measurements Ship to Shore

Maritime companies include businesses and governments that develop and utilize hardware to support shipyards, marine terminals, cargo and trade support, exploration and defense, fishing, aquaculture, seafood processing, commercial diving, energy infrastructure and platforms, along with marine transportation. There are multiple categories of maritime companies, including those that build ships, provide maintenance, and oversee logistics for moving an estimated 11 billion tons of goods every year.

A subset of these maritime companies operate vessels and equipment that are responsible for the transport of people and cargo. It is estimated that in the United States, maritime companies employ over 400,000 workers. They are responsible for operating, transporting, moving, and transferring equipment and materials. There is a heavy reliance on reliable cargo cranes and lifting equipment to assist workers in these functions.

Due to the nature of work, safety and regulation are key to maintaining core operations for any type of maritime transport. The work performed on the vessels, as well as on dock, rely on heavy-duty equipment that utilizes accurate measurement for performance, weighing, monitoring, and reporting. Fundamental is the durability of the sensor equipment to withstand unpredictable environmental conditions. Quality, ruggedized equipment that is durable is vital in the operations that utilize waterways to transport goods port to port. This is where Interface plays a vital role as a supplier of measurement and weighing solutions that are designed for maritime use.

One of the most common use cases for Interface Maritime solutions is in the design and operational use of cranes. Cargo handling and crane operations are considered to be one of the most dangerous maritime jobs. The unpredictable nature of onshore and offshore environments requires crane operators to function with precise and accurate measurements throughout all procedures.

Sensors and instrumentation must be able to withstand the various exposures related to maritime work, while meeting the demanding schedules for heavy lifting, as well as moving single and multiple cargo containers at a time. In these types of maritime operations, speed is also an advantage for loading and unloading vessels. Considerations of weight of the cargo and environmental condition monitoring require accurate measurement.

Crane Capacity Verification and Block Safety Monitoring

As demonstrated in the Crane Capacity Verification Application and Crane Block Safety Check Application, a customer requires a system to detect if their crane block can lift heavy loads securely, in order to keep working conditions and personnel safe at docks and other maritime transportation applications. If lifting capacities are exceeded, the customer wants a system to alarm them in real-time.


Interface products are ideal for use in heavy equipment that the maritime industry relies upon for a wide variety of equipment used to push, pull, lift, release, contain, and move things in water and on land. Wireless and environmentally protected submersible solutions are standard fare for this industry. Interface load cells, torque transducers, load pins, load shackles and tension links, as well as DAQ and instrumentation solutions provide accurate force and torque data to monitor and confirm the design and in-action processes.  To keep your instrumentation protected, inquire about our Interface Enclosures.

Additional Resources

  1. Maritime Measurement Solutions for Onshore and Submersible Applications
  2. Ruggedized Test and Measurement Solutions Webinar
  3. Interface Submersible Load Cells
  4. Serving the Maritime Industry
  5. Hydrofoil Testing in Wave Tank
  6. Crane Force Regulation
  7. Crane Capacity Verification
  8. Crane Block Safety Check
  9. WTS Yacht Rigging Inspection
  10. Mooring Line Tension Testing
  11. Mooring Quick Release Hooks (QRH)
  12. Commercial Fishing Wire Rope Testing

Interface Crane Use Cases and Application Notes

Manufacturers and engineers of heavy equipment are rigorous about the design quality, performance and most importantly preserving safety. Having tools to test and monitor this type of equipment allows equipment producers and users to review performance at all stages, ultimately maintaining a safe working environment which is critical to any construction, transportation, or infrastructure project job site. That’s why Interface provides quality force measurement products for a host of industrial equipment machines to accurately measure force, load capacity, weight, tension and more.

Interface has been a long-time supplier of force and torque sensors along with instrumentation products for projects involving all types of cranes and lifting machines. We are frequently asked to provide crane force measurement solutions for applications used in hoisting, lifting, moving, and transporting heavy objects. These use cases range across all types of environments, from constructing high rises in metropolitan centers around the world to maritime industry users loading docks and lifting watercraft.

To outline how force measurement is used to monitor cranes, we developed a series of application notes explaining the components Interface provided to allow our customer to measure safety, reliability, and efficiency of their equipment.

Crane Capacity Verification

The first application note outlines a project in which the customer wanted to verify that their crane was strong enough to safely lift a heavy load at its rated maximum load capacity. It was determined that because of the size of the crane, a wireless solution was needed to avoid long wires and burdensome installation. Interface provided a WTSTL Lightweight Wireless Tension Link Load Cell to measure the load’s maximum capacity. WTS-RM1 Wireless Relay Output Receiver Modules were also used to trigger an alarm that can be set when the maximum capacity of weight/force has been reached. To review the data the customer could transmit the data to a PC or laptop with a WTS-BS-4 USB base station. The data can also be reviewed through a WTS-BS-1-HS Wireless Handheld Display. With this solution, the customer was able to verify if the crane is safe and functional enough to lift it’s working load limit (WLL), or safe working load (SWL) capacity.

Read the full Crane Capacity Verification Application Note here.

Crane Block Safety Check

The next example features a crane application in which the customer wanted to detect whether a crane block could lift a heavy load securely to keep working conditions safe for personnel. The customer specifically wanted the solution to include an alarm feature that notified them if lifting capacity was exceeded in real-time. Using a WTSLP Wireless Stainless Steel Load Pin in place of a load bearing pin in the crane block, they could measure the force being applied by the heavy load. Data will be transmitted and displayed through both the WTS-BS-4 USB Base Station. It can also be paired with the WTS-BS-1-HA Wireless Handheld for real-time safety monitoring. The WTS-RM1 Wireless Relay Output Receiver Module triggers an alarm when maximum capacity has been reached. The customer was able to verify if the crane was operating safely and was always functional enough to lift it’s working load limit (WLL) or safe working load (SWL) capacity. The added alarm feature is critical for notifying users when the crane reaches unsafe limits during operations.

Read the entire Crane Block Safety Check Application note here.

Crane Force Regulation 

In the final application note, a customer wanted to regulate the maximum number of heavy loads being lifted, so that production time was both safe for workers and efficient. The goal was to complete lifting duties faster and with little or no expense. A wireless solution was also preferred, so that there would be no long cable interference during production. Interface supplied a WTSLP Wireless Stainless Steel Load Pin, which can be custom made to be used for any and all types of cranes. It is also great for lifting both short and long distances. The load pin was paired with the WTS Wireless Telemetry System, where force could be measured and logged. The customer was able to monitor the continuous force from the crane, and gather information on loads being lifted for continuous safety and production reporting requirements.

Read the complete Crane Force Regulation Application Note here.

You can read more about heavy equipment testing and use cases in our post, Force Measurement Solutions for the Construction Industry.

Force Measurement Solutions for the Construction Industry

In the world of heavy machinery, the ability to protect these investments is critical to an efficient and cost-effective worksite. This is especially true in the construction industry, where any type of damage or disruption to onsite equipment can significantly delay project timelines and cost a construction company hundreds of thousands of dollars, or more.

Protecting equipment is important in the industry; however, the safety of people is paramount. Severe failures of the equipment can be dangerous to machine operators. One way construction companies are protecting people and their material investments is through the use of force sensor technologies with Interface’s precision load cells, torque transducers, load pins, tension links and load shackles, as well as data acquisition instrumentation.

The use of force measurement is a growing trend in construction because companies realize that they can use force sensors to track performance data on a wide variety of heavy machinery. This data can inform machine operators when they were pushing the machines past their respective limits.

Applications of Force Measurement Products Used in the Construction Industry

One of the key use cases of force sensors used in the construction industry is on heavy machinery attachments. Construction sites frequently utilize a crane, which is used to lift large bundles of material such as wood or steel with a grabbing type attachment, or used to transport construction workers to large heights with a basket or platform attachment.

For cranes outfitted with a lifting attachment such as a claw, a tension sensor can be used on the pulley mechanism to measure the weight lifted by the crane. The tension sensor can provide real-time data to the construction crew to help monitor the lifting process and provide the operator with the information necessary to refrain from lifting weights that are too heavy for the crane to handle. If the claw arm lifts more than the crane is able to withstand, the attachment could break off, or worse, the crane could topple over.

Another example of a crane attachment that can benefit from a force measurement sensor is the basket or platform type attachment used to transport workers to great heights. In this use case, a rotary actuator between the basket attachment and crane can be outfitted with a pressure transducer. This type of sensor will help measure the force placed on the attachment point to help rotate the basket in multiple directions and provide force data to ensure the basket isn’t over-rotated or carrying too much weight.

The final example of sensor technology used in construction is with a smart clamp. This is a use case that can be seen in multiple industries, in addition to the construction industry. A smart clamp, or soft-touch clamp, uses a compression load cell attached to a gauged piece of metal on both ends of the clamp. The clamp attachment is often placed on the end of a forklift type machine and used to transport delicate materials, packages, and other materials.

The compression load cell works by providing data back to the operator, letting them know how much force can be used to grab the object without breaking it. This used case is often found in the consumer packaging industry but can also be applied to the construction industry when transporting delicate building materials.

For many years, construction companies used this type of equipment and heavy machinery without the use of force sensors, making it harder to keep the equipment and workers safe. Today, more companies that develop attachments and heavy machinery have begun exploring force sensors to optimize the use of these machines. This creates a safer, more efficient and cost-effective environment for construction companies and protects their workers.

To learn more about specific construction industry use cases, review our detailed application notes below:

Lifting Heavy Objects

Harness Durability Testing

Interface is engaging with a number of customers in these industries to develop solutions to keep equipment safe and performing at optimal efficiency. To learn more about how force sensors can be used to protect your investments, contact our specialized application engineers and representatives of Interface products and solutions.

Contributor: Dan McAneny, co-founder and sales engineer at Tritek Solutions, one of Interface’s sales representatives covering the Pacific Northwest.