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Interface Load Cells 201 General Procedures Guide

The Interface Load Cells 201 Guide is an extract from our comprehensive go-to for the force measurement industry, the Interface Load Cell Field Guide.

This shortened reference zeros in on general procedures for using load cells. With in-depth explanations, illustrations, practical procedures, and insightful tips, this Interface technical support resource is a helpful guide to have on hand. It is designed to support general procedures using load cells, optimize your processes, and achieve exceptional results in any force measurement application.

Interface Load Cells 201: General Procedures Guide topics include:

  • Excitation Voltage: Understand the crucial role of voltage in powering your load cell and learn techniques for remote sensing, ensuring accurate readings every time.
  • Physical Mounting: Master proper mounting with detailed instructions for both “dead” and “live” ends, ensuring maximum precision and optimal cell life.
  • Mounting Procedures for Different Load Cell Models: Whether you’re working with beam cells, mini cells, low profile cells with or without bases, or any other type, the guide provides clear, step-by-step instructions for a perfect setup.
  • Mounting Torques and Fixtures: Get the torque values right for your specific transducer, ensuring secure mounting without compromising performance.

This quick guide eliminates errors and ensures reliable data with expert mounting techniques. It helps to extend the life of a load cell, protecting your investment with proper installation practices that maximize cell longevity. A complete copy can be found below.  To save a copy, go here.

Looking for even more in-depth support? Interface offers additional resources, including installation manuals, video tutorials, technical support, and a complete library of Interface 101 articles.

VIDEOS TUTORIALS AND RESOURCES

 SUPPORT REFERENCES

 TECHNICAL INFO AND GUIDES

If you have questions about any of these topics, need help selecting the right sensor, or want to explore a specific application, contact Interface Application Engineers.

Interface Load Cell 201 Guide- 2024 Edition

Load Cell Mounting 101

Properly mounting a load cell ensures the sensor provides the most stable readings and accurate measurements. Although a load cell will function no matter how it is oriented and operated in tension or compression mode, mounting instructions are specific to each sensor model.

Interface provides complete product datasheets and drawings to locate the features for mounting. Our instructions include model, material, capacity, mounting holes, threads and dowel pins, and pilot specifications for live and dead-end use.

All load cells have a “dead” end and a “live” end. Commonly, the dead end is the mounting end directly connected to the output cable or connector by solid metal. Conversely, the live end is separated from the output cable or connector by the strain gage area of the flexure.

This concept is significant because mounting a cell on its live end makes it subject to forces introduced by moving or pulling the cable. However, mounting it on the dead end ensures that the forces coming in through the cable are shunted to the mounting instead of being measured by the load cell.

SPECIAL INTERFACE LOAD CELL MOUNTING TIP: The Interface load cell nameplate reads correctly when the cell sits on the dead end on a horizontal surface. Therefore, the user can employ the nameplate lettering to specify the required orientation to the installation team explicitly. For example, for a single-cell installation holding a vessel in tension from a ceiling joist, the user would specify mounting the cell so that the nameplate reads upside down. For a cell mounted on a hydraulic cylinder, the nameplate would read correctly when viewed from the end of the hydraulic cylinder.

WATCH: MOUNTING TIPS FROM OUR LOAD CELL BASICS WEBINAR

DEFINING YOUR MOUNTING REQUIREMENTS

Mechanical mounting is one of the most critical aspects determining your application’s success. This is a sensor-based decision, as load cell models have different features that can be used for various mounting requirements.

First, define how you will attach your load cells.  Are they going to be using threaded connections? Are you going to have the load cells press up against a surface? Are you using an actuator, rod-end bearings, or clevises?

Other considerations regarding mounting are the objects used to secure the sensor. Will you use adhesive? Will it be secured inline, or do you need a through-hole for mounting? Will you be using mounting plates, and what is the geometry of the plates? The material used and the stiffness of the mounting components can affect the measurement’s performance and accuracy. READ: Interface Sensor Mounting and Force Plates

The direction of the load will impact your decision on the best approach.  All load cells have a live end and a dead end. It is not a single direction; some live ends may be at the top or the bottom.  The live-end and dead-end design will influence your cable and wireless management.

If you apply torque when installing fasteners, it is important not to twist the sensor. Tip: Hold the load cell at the same end where you are installing a fixture to prevent damage to the device.

Load Cell Mating Surface Tips

  • The surface must be clean and flat
  • The mounting surface must be flat to 0.0002 total indicator reading
  • Suitable thickness and material
  • Recommended hardness of Rc 30 or higher
  • Mounting bolt torque according to specifications

Installation Care

Make sure the threaded connections are tight and preloaded, if possible. Pre-loading removes the system’s slop and prevents wear, which is critical when using the sensor for fatigue testing. It is also essential to pre-load to get the performance as designated in the calibration certification.

For compression loading, you want one flat surface and one radius surface. Make sure you only have one curved surface. Typically, the load cell will have a radius surface, so you will want to load it against a flat surface. Identifying the load point is harder if you have two flat surfaces. If you have two radius surfaces, they will tend to slide apart. This can create bending and be dangerous to the technician.

Interface offers load cells with and without bases. When supplied together, the base is engineered to be an appropriate and “matching” mating surface for the sensor.  If you are using a load cell without a base, it is important to mount it to something like the base in flatness, stiffness, and thickness so they do not deform under load. This is critical to get the most accurate measurement.

QUICK REVIEW: MOUNTING CHECKLIST

  • Load Cells not mounted by the manufacturer’s recommendations may not perform to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • Make sure that mounting surfaces are clean, flat, and aligned.
  • Torque of all mounting hardware to specifications.
  • Always confirm the load cell orientation: the “dead” end on mechanical reference or load forcing source and the “live” end connected to the load to be measured. Typically, the dead end is the end closest mechanically to the cable exit or connector.
  • Use proper hardware (thread sizes, jam nuts, and swivels) to connect the load to the load cell.
  • It is fundamental to have one and only one load path.
  • This load path must be through the load axis of the load cell. This may sound elementary; however, it is a commonly overlooked problem.

Utilizing best practices in mounting is also extremely important. Deflections in the system can introduce errors and apparent crosstalk into the sensor measurement.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Universal Load Cells 101

Mounting Tips for Multi-Axis Sensors

Mounting Plates

6A Mounting Tightening Torques

3A Mounting Instructions

Flange Style Load Cells and Torque Transducers 101

Basics on Load Cell Base Kits

LowProfile™ Load Cell Base Kits

 

 

Basics on Load Cell Base Kits

As resilient and accurate as load cells are engineered, there is risk of damaging a load cell if they are not properly supported through mounting or mating to the test subject or test bench.

Load cell bases are designed to support and stabilize load cells. Load cell bases come in assorted sizes and configurations, depending on the intended application and the weight capacity.

Load cell bases are used with load cells that are frequently utilized in industrial equipment, test machines, and commercial testing labs. They may also be integrated into several types of equipment, such as weighbridges, conveyor systems, structural test stands, and packaging machines.

Interface publishes numerous guides on properly supporting a load cell during a test. However, for our LowProfile™ load cells, we provide complete Load Cell Base Kits to provide the engineered accuracy and necessary support for precision performance as intended in regular use. Bases minimize risks in damaging load cells from improper use.

Load cells with positive overload protection must be ordered with an Interface installed base. The positive overload option is useful when high overloads occur in applications such as: impact loads on weighing platforms; engine malfunctions during rocket or jet engine testing; transient overloads on engine dynamometers.

Interface’s Load Cell Base Kits are a type of mounting plate guaranteed to provide optimum support for the flexure. Using the base, or a support surface with its equivalent flatness and stability, is required to ensure the exceptional performance. They are heat treated and high strength bases, available in all standard sizes of our low profile models.

Standard thread size is the same as the mating load cell. Bases or flat mounting surfaces are required for all low profile load cell installations. A mounting surface that is flat to 0.0002″ T.I.R. (total indicator reading) is required, unless a base is installed.

Use of the base, or a support surface with its equivalent flatness and stability, is required to ensure the exceptional performance of the LowProfile® Series.

The threaded hole in the base is on center, and a plug is permanently installed to seal dirt and moisture out of the space between the bottom hub of the flexure and the flat surface of the base. Center hub deflects under the load until it contacts the base which provides positive overload protection. The center tapped hole is sealed to keep overload surfaces clean.

When the base and load cell are ordered together, the base and plug are factory installed using the proper hardware tightened to the required torque specs. A plug is supplied in between the cell and the base to prevent damage or errors caused by over engagement of mating parts.

There are 14 model options in standard Load Cell Base Kits in both U.S. and Metric Threads. They are available for our standard 1000, 1100 and 1200 Load Cell Series of various capacities. We offer 15 stainless steel model options to be paired with our 2400 and 3200 Load Cell Series.

Load Cell Base Kits are an excellent accessory to ensuring the most out of your LowProfile Load Cells provide the performance as designed. For complete instructions on installations, please reference our Support section on the website.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Accessories

Load Cell Basics Sensor Specifications

Interface Presents Load Cell Basics

Technical Library

Force Measurement Installation Guides

Mechanical Installation Load Cell Troubleshooting 101

Force Measurement Installation Guides

Interface is a long-time provider of the world’s most accurate and reliable force measurement products. Our sensor and instrumentation solutions are used across industries to test and monitor everything from critical infrastructure and to advanced robotics. Innovators and engineers know that our quality is unmatched. However, any measurement device manufacturer nor superior quality of a product can save users from poor performance when making this one critical mistake, poor installation.

Proper installation is one of the absolute keys to reliable and accurate test data and successful measurement programs. This is true for any type of test and measurement protocol, in particular utilizing force measurement.

Preparing for any installation for any load cell force or weighing measurement system is dependent of the integrity of the physical installation, interconnection of the components, following proper performance of the system components, and calibration.

Installation success is such an important topic, we asked Interface engineers and application experts for their thoughts on the top reasons why proper installation is critical to a successful test or vice versa. They also shared helpful guidance on why improper installation can be so damaging.

  • Poor installation can lead to damaging the load cell, so to protect your investment follow the installation instructions that a accompany your product.
  • When we provide performance metrics on our product, it is based on our in-house calibration. When improperly installed, you will not be hitting the performance numbers you need during use.
  • Improper installation can cause overload which can not only damage the load cell, but also create unsafe working conditions.
  • Installation guides not only give you the proper installation techniques, but they also provide the correct order for installation.
  • And our favorite tip, and the most relatable, “Improper installation with ultimately lead to headaches!

Installation can also vary widely between load cells and other force measurement solutions. Each product has different processes depending on the mounting components, the application being tested or monitored, the environment in which the application is being tested or monitored, and more. It is important to carefully review any materials provided with the instrumentation and sensor.

Interface provides a wide variety of installation guides, instructions and technical support online. You can find these instruction guides by visiting our support installation and manuals option.

In addition, we have resources providing clear explanation on installation and its importance. Recently, our video and blog series titled, I’ve Got A Load cell – Now What? Part 6 – Usage & Best Practices, includes in-depth information on installation and mounting.

Mechanical Installation Tips

Once you have your load cell hooked up and your instrumentation scale, it is time to put it to work. You want to review the attachment, including thread engagement and mounting. If you are threading into the live end, the center hub on the low profile load cell, make sure you have enough threads engaging into the load cell itself. We recommend that you thread it into where the studs bottom out, then back up a half a turn. Next step is to preload tension load by about 130% of capacity and jam the jam nut. We want to ensure that we do not have any repeatability issues due to thread engagement of the flexure. If you cannot provide a preload, reference the torque values in the installation guide.

Mounting to Base, Structure or Plate Tips

  • Use Grade 8 or Better Hardware
  • Mount to Total Flatness of .002″
  • R30-33 Hardness Scale
  • Follow the star patter to proper torque values
  • Preinstalled Bases

Interface bases help in making integration to any assembly much easier. Interface manufactures bases with the same high-performance materials and specifications for hardness and flatness as our load cells. The bases offer threaded holes, which make it easier for mechanics like hydraulic actuators.

We also offer several references for troubleshooting. Two important considerations to review during set-up are the mechanical and electrical installation requirements.

Mechanical Installation Troubleshooting: Load cells not mounted in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations may not perform to specifications. It is important to review the mounting surfaces, hardware, and orientation during the installation.

Electrical Installation Troubleshooting: Proper load cell performance is depending upon the electrical system. The areas to inspect during any install are the connections, cables, settings of excitation voltage and loading of the bridge circuit.

We urge that to get the most out of your new load cell to reference the materials provided in the installation guides. If you have any questions, Interface is also here to help. Feel free to reach out to your local representatives and distributors or call us directly at 480-948-5555 to speak with an engineer to help solve your installation challenges.

I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? Episodes 5 and 6

Reviewing the test and measurement video I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What?, today we are highlighting Episodes 5 and 6 in the favored series.

These two installments highlight instrumentation and installation tips with best practice recommendations for the most popular load cell, the 1200 LowProfile, in addition to the 1100 LowProfile, SM S-Type and WMC Stainless Steel Miniature Load Cell products.

Once you have selected measurement device, it is equally important to review your instrumentation options. You will need a way of interpreting the output or the voltage from the load cell. This requires connecting to some type of instrumentation. If you already own an instrumentation device, you need to ensure that it is useable with any new force measurement device.

Interface offers a large line of instrumentation, from simple indicators to more complex multi-channel data acquisition systems used with multi-axis sensors, load cells and torque transducers. In addition to watching the video, be sure to check out our Instrumentation Selection Guide.

If you are selecting new instrumentation, there are a few questions to help qualify what will work best. For example, do you need a simple device to read analog outputs or advanced wireless instrumentation used with calibration-grade equipment? What type of software will you need to analyze the output data? Will you be connecting the instrumentation to a computer? As discussed in, I’ve Got a Load Cell Episode 5, here are some basic considerations for instrumentation.

Instrumentation Selection

Step 1: Electrical Wiring – Review the electrical wiring diagrams (also available on each product page). If you need to review the wiring based on engineered-to-order or custom options, contact our application engineers.

Step 2:  Signal Leads – Are you using a 4 or 6-wire configuration? A 6-wire lead provides sense. Some instrumentation options will support 6-wire signal leads. Most applications allow you to just pair with excitation.

Step 3: Cables – Identify the type of cable required with the right number of leads. For example, our standard 6-wire cable will support the sense function. We recommend shielded conductors when you order your cables.

Step 4: Grounding – Avoid ground loops in any wiring.

Step 5: Excitation Voltage – Review the sensor’s voltage of excitation on the datasheet to identify the load cell calibration. We recommend to properly match with the instrumentation’s capabilities in voltage with the load cell.

Step 6: Set-Up – Once you connect your instrumentation, you need to scale it. Review your options in the installation instructions. Some instrumentation options will take an mV entry and others will require a known load or shunt calibration. Reference your device’s calibration certificate.

In the I’ve Got a Load Cell, Now What? series Episode 6, we highlight some important diagnostics, installation tips and best practices. This video highlights examples of installation for some of our most popular load cells.

During the selection of your load cell, which usually begins with capacity and capabilities requirements, it is important to consider performance influencing factors and installation.

Use Case Considerations

  • Environmental Considerations and Exposure
  • Fatigue or Non-Fatigue
  • Overload Protection Needs
  • Off-Axis Loads
  • Dimensions
  • Mounting and Base Requirements
  • Output
  • Installation Set-Up

If you already have an older load cell, we recommend doing some back load cell health checks before putting it back into use. How can you evaluate the health of your load cell? You can do some simple diagnostics with load cells. Here are three recommended diagnostics:

  1. Zero Balance Check – If the load cell has been in use for some time, it is good to determine if there has been any potential overload or damage to the load cell. If the zero balance has shifted up or down from the nominal, that is an indication the load cell should be evaluated or repaired prior to using it in test applications.
  2. RCal or Shunt Calibration Check – Any shift from the specifications or certificate requires further evaluation.
  3. Bridge Evaluation – Some instrumentation will allow you to do a bridge evaluation. If you have any concerns on the performance or accuracy of the output, contact Interface to discuss tools that you can use to evaluate the bridge of the load cell.

The next section of Episode 6 highlights the 1200 LowProfile features, installation tips, and mounting options for assembly.

Mechanical Installation Tips

Once you have your load cell hooked up and your instrumentation scale, it is time to put it to work. You want to review the attachment, including thread engagement and mounting. If you are threading into the live end, the center hub on the low profile load cell, make sure you have enough threads engaging into the load cell itself. We recommend that you thread it into where the studs bottom out, then back up a half a turn. Next step is to preload tension load by about 130% of capacity and jam the jam nut. We want to ensure that we do not have any repeatability issues due to thread engagement of the flexure. If you cannot provide a preload, reference the torque values in the installation guide.

Mounting to Base, Structure or Plate Tips

  • Use Grade 8 or Better Hardware
  • Mount to Total Flatness of .002″
  • R30-33 Hardness Scale
  • Follow the star patter to proper torque values
  • Preinstalled Bases

Interface bases help in making integration to any assembly much easier. Interface manufactures bases with the same high-performance materials and specifications for hardness and flatness as our load cells. The bases offer threaded holes, which make it easier for mechanics like hydraulic actuators.

Brian Peters and Elliot Speidell continue to detail the assembly and best practices for three additional products. You can watch more installation tips and recommendations related to the 1100 Model Ultra Precision Compression Only LowProfile Load Cells, SM S-Type Tension and Compression Load Cells and our popular WMC Sealed Stainless Steel Miniature Load Cell.

Interface publishes all our installation guides, diagrams and resources for support online. Go to our support resources for additional help.

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel to get the latest videos on products, applications and user tips.

Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part Two

Interface hosted a series of ForceLeaders webinars this past year covering topics that included multi-axis sensors, instrumentation, torque transducers, custom solutions and more.  We plan to continue this popular series into the new year, based on the feedback we have received about topics of interest and support requirements.

One of the features that we like to include in our events is answering a list of top questions, as well as questions we get from the participants.  In our event, Load Cell Basics, we covered a lot of interesting inquiries as well as the top questions we get about our precision load cell products.

We highlighted the first group of questions in our recent post, Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part One. And there is more, below highlights additional questions we addressed during the live event.   A recap of the webinar is also online, reviewing key topics we discussed during the one-hour learning event with force measurement experts Keith Skidmore and Brian Peters.

Is There a Better Way to Tare a Load Cell?

Tare is defined as a deduction from the gross weight of a substance and its container made in allowance for the weight of the container, which is sometimes also called the vessel.  For purposes of this reference, we are noting the container is the actual body of the load cell.

Whether you tare a load cell by electronics or mechanical, preload taring of the system is typically done through instrumentation.  You want to ensure that whatever mechanical tare load you have on the sensor isn’t going to impede on your usable capacity range. As far as the load cell is concerned, there really is no need to accommodate any sort of mechanical tare. These are linear devices if you stay within the range.  On the mechanical preload side, it is important how you preload some of attachments especially for the LowProfile load cells. We recommend to preload if you can. It is what we do for best results so that the load path doesn’t change through the threads, which can affect very small amounts of linearity hysteresis

Does Frequency Measurement Limit Impact How Fast the Load Cell Responds?

This is a function of the mechanical flexure design for that sensor. It is important to note that each sensor is a mechanical spring. Depending on the stiffness or the deflection characteristics of a load cell, you will have different natural frequency characteristics. This information is typically documented on our product data sheets by model and configuration.  Generally, the stiffer the sensor the better it’s going to perform in cyclic applications.

Adding to this, Keith notes that load cells are great at hundreds of hertz. If you are asking about tens of thousands of hertz, they are not. There is a spot where very high frequencies of these standard load cells aren’t as effective. Most of our typical testing customers who are applying cyclical loads to a test specimen will confirm that low profile or strain gage-based load cells are great for their frequency requirements.  Work with our application engineers if you have a frequency requirement that is extremely high.

Tare and Working Up an Error Budget

This question comes in from an engineer that is working up a calculated error budget that has a mechanical tare load on that system already. Before you start your test, if you tare it how does that factor into your initial preload in the system? Will it impact your error budget? The answer is that yes, it can have some impact. You can zero out your temperature effect on zero; however, if you have a lot of preloads, you can’t. You must go back to zero to zero it out. This can impact your error budget. Basically, if you zero out, it eliminates the temperature effect. You cannot make the same assumption in your budget if you have considerable preloads.

Does Interface Recommend Particular Amplifier Instrumentation Products?

We do have a wide variety of amplifier solutions. They range from small embeddable amplifiers up to inline options that are DIN rail mounted.  We also have various digital output instrumentation productions available for ethernet, ether cat, Modbus, and USB.

It is important in your consideration to understand that there are errors that can impact instrumentation performance. Selecting the right instrumentation should be a function of the application and what are the changes in testing environment. Resolution is critical in your decision if you are doing a digital type conversion. There’s a lot of parameters to consider. Our recommendation would be to look at what is available from Interface and contact our application engineers to review your specific requirements.

What is the Most Frequent Problem When Installing a Load Cell?

One of the issues are asked about is usually related to the mechanical installation. It’s not as simple as just a nut, bolt, and threaded connection. There is a lot more to it and it’s often and discounted how important it is to ensure things are aligned properly so that you don’t have any parallel load paths. All the load must go through the load cell to make a proper measurement. For example, if you have a mounting plate and the plates are riding on the heads of the screws of the load cell, it is going to shunt the load. Mechanical installation is often missed in the test set-up design. It is often not given enough weight in importance of your test.

We also often see that users have either inadequate torque in an assembly or perhaps too much torque for the lower capacity load cells.  It’s advised to be careful of the installation torque. We recommend that if you aren’t familiar with mechanical installation, ask us for our detailed installation instructions. We provide guidance in terms of recommended torque values and proper methods of where to attach the sensor. It’s easy to over torque a load cell, as they are designed to see axial loads. We have seen users people crank on things and transmitting too much torsional load through creating performance issues that might not show up right away.

Do Cables and Amplifiers Affect Results of Load Cell Calibration?

The answer is absolutely it can impact your results. It doesn’t mean it will, but it can affect performance and measurement accuracy. For example, if you change the cable length or have an instrument that is a different temperature with cable running out of an oven into cooler temperature room, these things can influence the measurement. Even if the load cell is at a constant temperature but the cable is changing temperature, it will cause a signal to change. That’s not something you want in your measurement.

You may mitigate temperature by shielding the cable or you could have a fatter cable which could have less of an effect. Some of these things can be calibrated out. If you add a long cable and then apply loads to your load cell, it considers that there is a longer cable, and you can completely calibrate out the effect of the cable length on the signal dropping due to the resistance. Some instruments use sense to measure the voltage at the load cell. In that case, it is insensitive to any cable effect. You can change cable lengths and it doesn’t make any difference.

Is a 10kn (2,250) lb. Force Application Too Much for a 2,000 lb. Load Cell?

Yes, it’s above the calibrated range and thus you can’t guarantee performance. Load cells will typically stay linear over capacity but there’s no guarantee on the accuracy. This is especially true if you overload with frequency. You’re starting to exercise the load cell in areas where we’d recommend you stay away from to keep the results accurate. Oftentimes, you’re better off going with a larger sensor. Pay attention to the actual output. That’s one advantage of most of our products, especially in the LowProfile range.

Is There Maximum Sampling Frequency for Strain Gage Load Cells?

It is going to depend somewhat on the model of the load cell. Hundreds of hundreds of hertz are certainly adequate. If you start getting close to the natural frequency posted on our product data sheet, we recommend you review the application with our application engineers.

We know engineers who use load cells for safety impact testing. For example, you might need to sample 10 kilohertz. The load cell doesn’t make a difference for how fast you sample the signal, but those cells can only respond in typically a millisecond response time. There are no moving parts or active circuitry; however, typically testing is going to test something until it fails. It is suggested to sample it at a couple thousand hertz to make sure you capture that exact point where the system fails or spikes. If you do have some concern over creep error that’s introduced, record what that non-zero value is as soon as you release that load. That is an accurate measurement of how much creep error was introduced being symmetric.

We exercise our load cells before calibration. It’s relatively quick and typically done in hydraulic frames which are automated to test where they cycle the load in short cycle intervals, like 30 seconds. It’s really the magnitude of the exercising, not how long it lasts. If load is being tested at 120% for an hour, that’s no better than 10 seconds, other than it introduced a lot of creep for an hour. Exercising means you must wait longer for the creep to return, so if the load is a fast cycle, you can check the zero quickly.

If you have additional questions for our experts, we recommend that you visit our technical support resources. We have commonly asked questions, installation guides and manuals and more.  We are also here to support you. Contact our technical support team if you need assistance.

Additional Resources

 

Load Cell Field Guide

Load Cell Basics Sensor Specifications

Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part One

Interface 1200 Precision LowProfile Load Cell Series Product Highlight