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Demands for Quality Energy Measurement Solutions

Powering the world is no simple task, especially as research and innovation into alternative energy sources are at an all time high. Across the energy supply chain there are soaring demands from engineers, scientists, equipment makers and suppliers to provide quality and accurate market solutions.

The energy market is constantly evolving to power our infrastructure as well as finding new ways to reduce our carbon footprint. Interface is a key differentiator when it comes to test and measurement. We play an important role in the development and deployment of effective energy market solutions as our sensor technologies are used to test and monitor energy equipment, sources and methods for extraction and containment. As well, Interface is center in supplying devices used in the development of fueling alternatives and introducing new energy solutions.

To explain our role in the energy market and how are products can be used by engineers in these industries, Interface Energy Solutions Overview details the types of products and examples of applications used by industry market leaders and innovators.

Interface force measurement solutions are used in all types of energy related applications to produce oil, gas, wind, coal, solar, hydrogen, nuclear, geothermal and emerging energy sources around the world. We are recognized as a provider of choice for our reliability and accuracy in designing, engineering, testing, innovating, and manufacturing precision sensor-based solutions for the energy industry.

One of the industries where Interface’s experience and knowledge of force measurement is vertically integrated into production and manufacturing processes is in the energy industry. The conditions energy professionals work in can be harsh. They are often in hazardous environments extracting oil and natural gas, wind, or coal to fuel our world’s dependencies for power. The equipment our energy sector customers use must be rugged and provide the most accurate results possible. If the equipment fails, our customers risk steep losses and exposure to safety hazards.

Based on market requirements, we recently introduced the new Interface Pressure Compensated Downhole Load Cell solution specifically designed for the energy sector. The downhole environment poses many challenges for well-drillers, operators, tool-string designers, and other engineers in the oil and gas industry. This innovation eliminates the need for “wet” load cells to monitor forces on their downhole load strings, which don’t hold up for extended use where there are extreme pressures and temperatures in a caustic environment. Interface created a dry load cell with an innovative protective design that reduces the number of sensors required in any downhole load string, extending the life of the load cell by a decade or more.

The types of products the energy market demands from Interface for these applications include standard LowProfile load cells, various torque transducers, multi-axis sensors and all types of instrumentation. We supply engineered to order and custom products for various energy testing environments and OEM solutions. The range of options include uniquely designed torque transducers, load washers, tension and compression load cells, load pins, wireless gear and more.

ENERGY APPLICATIONS USING INTERFACE PRODUCTS

  • Solar panel design and testing
  • Wireless monitoring devices
  • Submersible and hazardous environment products
  • Hydrogen electrolyzer devices
  • Storing and transporting crude oil and natural gas
  • Windmill testing and management
  • Wireline spool tension control
  • Oil and gas equipment
  • Hydro power generation
  • Hook load tension
  • Torque tong monitoring
  • Tool recovery and fishing
  • Wave energy
  • Downhole OEM parts
  • Calibration and equipment maintenance

Interface force measurement solutions are used in components, machines and field equipment for energy R&D and production. From prototyping to monitoring equipment, our durable load cells and torque transducers assist suppliers of parts along with energy industry leaders and innovators to fuel the world. You can find more energy applications here.

Energy-Brochure

To learn more about our work in the energy industry or to inquire about how our force sensors can benefit your next project, contact our application engineers today.

Additional Resources

Interface Helps Power the World

Interface Most Promising Energy Tech Solution Provider

Announcing the Launch of the Interface Pressure Compensated Downhole Load Cell

Fueling Global Demand for Interface Solutions

 

Force Sensing Keeps Factories Running Feature in Fierce Electronics

In the recent article, ‘May the force be with you: Force sensing keeps factories running, product quality high’ Dan O’Shea at Fierce Electronics writes about the growing demand for sensors in industrial automation applications.

Following his interview with Interface’s Keith Skidmore, Dan writes:

‘While some sensors are more focused on monitoring equipment or measuring environmental conditions around a manufacturing process, force sensors measure mechanical forces occurring in the equipment and processes, and the products being manufactured. They measure things like load, tension, resistance, weight or total pressure applied. By employing this kind of sensing technology, manufacturers can monitor the health of their equipment and improve quality assurance for their products.’

“Testing things by applying a force to them is super common. Many products in lots of industries get tested this way, from aerospace to automotive, through to consumer goods. Chairs, furniture, mattresses, ladders–basically, anything that’s being manufactured, there can be a desire to figure out how strong the various parts of those products are.” Keith Skidmore, engineer and regional sales director at Interface

Read the entire Fierce Electronics article here.

Interface provides industrial automation and IoT solutions to manufacturers, equipment makers and factories around the world. Sensors play a pivotal role in production and optimization through tools and process improvements.

Industrial Robotic Arm

Robotic arms are frequently used in production facilities throughout the manufacturing process. Suppliers of these devices heavily rely on accurate and quality sensors to provide feedback. In this application, the designer needed to test the force of the arm apparatus to ensure it could safely secure packages on a moving conveyor belt without damaging any materials or products. This automated function helps to improve quality of packaging and increase productivity on the line.

Interface provided the model 6A40A 6-Axis Load Cell with model BX8-HD44 Data Acquisition Amplifier instrumentation. The 6-Axis load cell provides measurement of all forces and torques (Fx, Fʏ, Fz, Mx, Mʏ, Mz) and the BXB-HD44 Data Acquisition Amplifier logs, displays, and graphs these measurements while sending scaled analog output signals for these axes to the robot’s control system. Customer installed 6A40 6-Axis Load Cell between robot flange and robot grabber. The extensive data outputs from the multi-axis sensor provided the exact detailed measurements needed for the industrial robotic application.

Faces of Interface Featuring Tin Nguyen

Today’s Faces of Interface features a person who might possibly hold the most titles in the company, and for good reason. Tin Nguyen is our calibration engineer, manufacturing engineer and business unit manager for calibration. Tin has earned all these titles along with the important responsibility through his relentless ability to take on and excel in new tasks, as well as his desire to learn. Check out his story.

Since he was about the age of eight years old, Tin had a proficiency for learning how to design and build things. It all started growing up on his grandparent’s farm where he would theorize ways to make tools and machines around the farm easier to use or more efficient. He vowed then that when he grew up, he would find a way to build things to make life easier for people.

Tin went on to attend Arizona State University (ASU), where he received a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering and in technology in 2000. He really enjoyed the ASU engineering school experience because it was hands on and he got to work with the latest technology, preparing him for the real world. While attending school, Tin also served as an auto mechanic for racing cars to earn some extra money on the side and because he really enjoyed the work.

Tin joined Interface in September 2001. He began his career as a calibration associate in the calibration lab. After a few years in the lab, Tin was then promoted to manufacturing engineer. A year later, he was promoted to calibration supervisor followed by the calibration departments business unit manager. His success in each of these roles allowed him to retain some of his titles and work throughout the company to lend his skills and expertise.

Today, his role covers quite a bit of what we do here at Interface. His day-to-day responsibilities include developing and maintaining tooling for calibration, fixturing, improving production processes, auditing equipment, figuring out ways to reduce costs, training calibration techs, maintaining calibration standards, looking after 20 different rigs, to highlight a few. His depth of experience and expertise lends to supporting and helping the company meet the growing demands for Interface’s quality products.

What Tin enjoys so much about working at Interface and continuing to take on new roles is that he loves to learn everything there is to know about the company and serving customers. Tin noted, there are a lot of talented people around him to provide that knowledge and support. After more than 20 years with the company, Tin still feels that he has more to learn. He’s also very honored by the trust that Interface and its leadership have placed in Tin to take on all of his important roles.

In his free time, Tin loves to travel and explore the great outdoors. He enjoys hiking, camping, fishing, boating and more. And, as if he doesn’t already have enough projects in his work life, Tin is also very fond of upgrading and remodeling his home. He takes a lot of ownership over the process and will do everything that he can before hiring somebody to help.

With all the hats Tin wears, he knows Interface inside out and we’re thrilled to have him and his cross-departmental expertise as part of the Interface family! We hope you enjoyed the newest entry into our Faces of Interface and if you’re looking to learn more about our talented staff, visit our ForceLeaders feature here.

Users of Interface Test and Measurement Products

Interface has a long history working with several types of users that rely on our products for test and measurement.

From pioneering engineers working in campus labs to ground-breaking scientists and innovators finding solutions to complex problems. We often share insights about the many industries that Interface serves and how our extensive line of products are used in a wide variety of applications within these industries.

In this Interface IQ Blog, we want to highlight individuals who use our products and discuss how they are used in various projects, programs, and testing environments.

We recently asked our customers how they utilize our products and here are their responses:

  • Calibration Equipment – 36%
  • Product Testing and Use in a Test Lab – 30%
  • New Product Design and Engineering Solutions – 25%
  • Products Manufactured into Original Equipment or Devices – 25%
  • Fatigue Testing – 20%
  • As Components of Other Products -16%
  • Experimentation – 14%
  • Education and Training 7%

Note that each responder chose all that applied in the survey.

Interface Product and Service User Types

Product Design Engineers

Product design engineers are involved from the very beginning of new production introduction (NPI). They are theorizing new products or product improvements, drawing designs, and developing prototypes. Force measurement plays a key role in NPI, enabling many different capabilities including automation, in-product performance monitoring, and more. These engineers benefit from Interface products because we offer top-quality performance, and we can uniquely customize our products and complete solutions to meet new product designs. Read our recent profile: Why Product Design Engineers Choose Interface.

Product Test Engineers

Product testing remains Interface’s largest user profile across industries. Interface provides various load cells, torque transducers, data acquisition instrumentation of all capabilities and capacities to create small and large testing solutions. We offer solutions for testing products, manufactured parts, prototypes, consumer goods, devices, OEM solutions and embedded components. We work directly with product testing engineers and test lab experts to supply standard, engineered-to-order, and customized solutions to fit into a test machines, rigs, and test benches. Often our products are designed right into the product to provide instant user feedback. Interface products are used to test everything from the structural integrity of an airplane to the minute forces of heart valve clamps used in open heart surgery. Product Test Engineers choose Interface due to the reliability and quality of sensors, along with precision accuracy.

Metrologists

Metrology is the science of measurement, embracing both experimental and theoretical determinations at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology. Therefore, it is all too common to find many Interface products within a metrology lab. Metrologists use Interface products to calibrate the machinery and tooling that will is frequently used during production and manufacturing. The relationship between Interface, metrologists and manufacturing engineers is an important one because each role in partnership ensures the quality of the products that leave the manufacturer’s doors.

Manufacturing Engineers and Production

Interface products can also be found within many of the machines, equipment, and tools on a manufacturing floor. These engineers will often use Interface products as embedded sensors or for process monitoring. With industrial automation, our sensor technologies are used to enable a machine to ensure certain robotics or automated functions are tuned correctly to provide the right amount of force. Some examples include packaging lines, bolt fastening, bottle capping machines in a soda factory or stamping machining that mark the minute symbols or logos on a pill. Manufacturing facility attendants also use force measurement to monitor machines in use. When force data is observed outside of a safe range, a manufacturing attendant may determine that a machine on the floor needs calibration or repair.

Educators

Another major customer of Interface are professors and lab techs in higher education facilities. Colleges and universities, specifically engineering departments often have Interface blue load cells and testing equipment onsite. Force measurement’s role is growing rapidly in STEM, as workforce demands seek out students experienced in R&D, engineering, design, mathematics, science and proving concepts. Therefore, professors are purchasing our products to give students hands-on experience with sensor technologies in early and advanced education. In fact, many young students today have exposure to products tested or using active sensors as part of their functions, like tablet displays, planet rovers, sports equipment, robotics, gaming brake pedals, rockets, and drones. Working together with academic institutions, we understand that having access to the best components helps develop future engineers as innovators.

This is a concise list of different people and titles we have worked with over the years. There are many more out there. Also, the use of force measurement sensors is growing rapidly in product design and development, so we expect this list to continue to expand. We are proud to serve such a diverse range of individuals, industries and applications and we look forward to what the future of force measurement holds.

Interface Solutions for Testing Tools

Interface load cells, torque transducers and instrumentation are commonly used in the test and measurement of different tools and fasteners used in testing products and actual production of various machines and components. The sensor data received in measuring assembly tools and fixtures used in securing nuts, bolts, and screws, is critical in making safe and reliable products.

For example, the ability to measure torque on screws and the force output of a screwdriver or wrench is very important when there are tight tolerances involved like in engineering and build of automotive or aerospace and defense machines and parts.

As we did for the machine testing blog, we’ve detailed a few examples of how Interface force and torque solutions are used in measuring tools performance for both design and assembly.  You can find additional application notes on these examples and more by visiting our industry solutions.

Bolt Fastening Force and Torque

An aerospace company was working on a test plan that involved taking torque and compression measurements on fasteners with varying joint materials. The system required both high and low sampling rates, in addition to the capability of precisely measuring force and torque simultaneously. They required reliable accuracy and long-term stability. The test plan intended to provide verification of required force and torque specifications for fasteners, to ensure safety without compromising installation. Interface suggested a LW or LWCF Load Washer in conjunction with a  T12 Square Drive Rotary Torque Transducer. With this solution, the customer was able to align force and torque measurements to desired levels. This was accomplished by combining the sensors with the high sample rate of the data logging and graphing capabilities of the SI-USB, capturing real-time force and torque levels for examination. The fasteners were tightened to the specified force and torque requirements and were safely installed without impairment to themselves or the joint material. The customer was able to measure the rapid event effectively and accurately. Read more about this bolt fastening solution here.

Aircraft Screwdriver Fastening Control

An airplane manufacturer needed a solution where they can control the torque when fastening screws on their airplane models. They didn’t want to create any damage to materials or apply too much torque when plane components are being fastened together. Interface suggested a T15 Hex Drive Rotary Torque Transducer, which can be attached to the fastening work bench, measuring and recording torque, rotational speed, and angle of the screwdriver. The LWCF Clamping Force Load Cell is installed, measuring the forces applied on the screw being fastened. Results are sent to the SI-USB4 4-channel USB Interface Module, which is connected to the customer’s PC or laptop where data is logged, graphed, and displayed. This solution allowed the airplane manufacturer to calibrate their screwdriver by measuring its torque, rotational speed, and angle, when attaching materials together for their airplane. They were also able to measure the forces being applied to the screw, to ensure it was not applying too much torque to the components. You can learn more about the aircraft screwdriver application here.

Ratchet Wrench Torque Verification

A customer wanted to perform regular torque testing on his ratchet-type torque wrench while recording these values for future examination. Interface supplied a model TS15 Square to Flange Reaction Torque Transducer with the INF-USB3 PC Interface Module for the customer to use. The customer mounted TS15 to work bench through flange and inserted the ratchet-type torque transducer into the TS15. Using this product, the customer was able to accurately perform their calibration checks and view the results while logging them to their PC Computer.  Learn more about this wrench torque verification testing here.

While not nearly as complex as machine testing applications, tools testing is equally important to the outcome of a project. The tools and fasteners used, even those as simple as a bolt and wrench, need to be accurately measured and assembled to avoid loose connection or overtightening that can damage the product. Interface provides a host of tool testing solutions for nearly anything that outputs force or torque. To learn more about our tool testing solutions, visit us at www.interfaceforce.com.

Additional Resources

Force Measurement Solutions for Bolt and Screw Fastening

Bolt Fastening- Force

Fastening Work Bench

Engine Head Bolt Tightening

Faces of Interface Featuring Bobby Calleja

Throughout his career in the manufacturing industry, Interface Planner Bobby Calleja has seen it all, from the aerospace industry to beauty products and circuit boards. His knowledge and experience in manufacturing has made him a critical member of the Interface family and we’re glad to share his story.

Bobby’s professional journey began in Long Island, New York, where he worked for his father at his machine shop. Being around his father and seeing his work ethic for the job, along with a passion for the industry, made Bobby realize that it’s what he wanted to do with his professional career.

Bobby worked for his father for six years before deciding it was time to do his own thing and get far from the cold New York winters. When he moved to Arizona, he began working at a small mom and pop aerospace facility that was eventually bought out by Goodrich Corporation. He began as a machinist and working his way up to night supervisor where he would oversee the repair and build of F16 fuel injectors. When his position was being moved to Iowa, Bobby was offered a job to move with it, but he opted to stay in Arizona.

His next move was with a manufacturer called Philosophy that made beauty care products. At Philosophy, Bobby served as a second shift supervisor where he managed that production from start to finish on the floor. After five years of working at Philosophy, the company was bought out and Bobby moved around to a few different manufacturing roles, including a circuit board facility for a few years.

In 2018, Bobby joined Interface. He began as a shipping clerk and then became a shipping manager a year later. In 2020, he was promoted to planner. Today, his role includes scheduling and planning parts to the floor for the Mini Load Cell product line, one of Interfaces most popular products.

“I enjoys the new role because of the challenge it provides. No two days are the same and the role is like working on a big, complicated puzzle. You have to fit the pieces in the right place to meet customer demand.” – Bobby Calleja, Product Planner at Interface, Inc.

When he’s not solving the day-to-day challenges of planning mini production, Bobby enjoys time spent his wife of 25 years and their two kids. His son recently graduated from Arizona State University and his daughter is going into her Junior year at Edinboro University in Pennsylvania. The family are huge Disney fans and Bobby is not ashamed to admit he’s first in line to take pictures with Mickey Mouse. Bobby is also an avid softball and baseball player and fan. He is also big music guy. Back in New York, Bobby spent his free time DJ’ing around the city.

We’re proud to have Bobby’s experience and talent on our production floor here at Interface and hope you enjoyed reading his story as much as we did sharing it. To learn more about our outstanding team, check in to the IQ blog each month at www.interfaceforce.com/blog/.

Force Sensors Advance Industrial Automation

Industrial automation heavily relies upon the use of sensor technologies to advance production and manufacturing. In the next phase of the industrial revolution, also referred to as Industry 4.0, gains in operational efficiencies are often rooted in innovative tools, robotics, and equipment renovations. These types of enhancements require use of interconnectivity, automation, machine learning, and real-time data. Interface is playing a significant role in enabling these advancements with smart force and torque measurement solutions.

Randy Franks at Sensor Tips poses the following question in a recent article: How can force sensing be integrated for Industry 4.0 upgrades?

“Upgrading facilities to industry 4.0 standards is one of the most significant trends in the manufacturing industry today. To do this, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are pushing hard to renovate their facilities with connected, automated devices and machines to create greater efficiency and cost savings. Smarter devices can ease the transition.”

He continues in his post to note, “For Industry 4.0, force measurement solutions providers are integrating actuators that move and control a mechanism or system with load cells to create fully automated force test systems.”

Illustrating how this work, Randy writes about manufacturers of mobile devices using force measurement testing automation to pressure test touch screens with the new Interface ConvexBT miniature-sized load button load cells

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Force Measurement for Efficiency in Food Processing and Packaging

Interface provides the food processing and packaging industry with sensor technologies that increase efficiency and reduce waste. Like many industrial facilities, organizations are pushing hard to integrate new technology and automation that makes processes faster, more adaptable, and smart.

One of the factors critical to creating a smarter factory is by utilizing force measurement sensors that are designed for collecting data in each production phase, as well as monitoring equipment in use for performance optimization.

Interface has a wide variety of precision-based accurate and reliable sensors used for various applications in food processing and packaging. Our customers are using miniature load cells within the production line to apply the exact force needed to delicately press a logo onto a edible product. We have others using multi-axis sensors from Interface to verify accuracy of intricately machined parts while moving through the manufacturing process.

We’ve provided sensors for industrial automation solutions to thousands of customers using in-stock as well as custom application-specific sensors for OEM equipment. Read our Force Measurement is Reducing Waste and Automating the Consumer Packaging Industry OEM case study to learn more.

Below are additional examples that highlight uses case of actual applications in food processing and packaging.  You can see additional industrial application highlights in our solutions overview by clicking here.

Commercial Food Processing

A food processing plant wanted accurate results of their in-motion check weigher when food is weighed and processed while moving down the belt.  A check weigher is an automated machine for checking the weight of packaged commodities. This included ensuring production line efficiency and food quality, real-time results of their food being weighed, and a load cell that can endure the food industry’s soiled environment.

Interface offered a solution using multiple SPI High-Capacity Platform Scale Load Cells that could be installed in the customer’s equipment that is sued through the production line where product is weighed on the conveyor. The SPI High-Capacity Platform Scale Load Cells delivers precise weighing data. When connected to the 920i Programmable Weight Indicator and Controller, the solution provides the customer real-time results of the weight of the food. The 920i Programmable Weight Indicator and Controller can also read up to four scale channels in real-time. The processing gains in efficiency were visualized and managed during the weighing process to optimize control and production. 

Water Bottle Dispensing and Weighing

 

A beverage bottle manufacturer wanted to dispense the right amount of fluid into their bottles, and then weigh their bottles to ensure it is at the labeled weight on their product packaging. This is both to minimize waste, but also to meet the standard requirements noted on the packaging. Interface suggested using the MBP Miniature Beam Load Cell, and attaching it under a plate or platform the water bottle is placed on while it is being filled with fluids. The force weight is measured by the MBP Miniature Beam Load Cell, and connected to the 9870 High-Speed High-Performance TEDS Ready Indicator where results are captured, displayed, and recorded by the customer utilizing their water bottle assembly machinery. With this solution, the water bottle manufacturer received highly accurate results of each water bottle being weighed in real-time, using the accuracy to reduce waste and speed processing time.

Snack Weighing and Packaging Machine                     

A snack manufacturing brand wanted to weigh the amount of consumable food product automatically dispersed into the bags during the packaging process. In this case, they needed to weigh their potato chips being packaged and ensure the potato chips are at the exact weight needed due to regulatory standards. Interface’s solution was to use multiple SPI Platform Scale Load Cells and install it to the potato multi-head weigher and packaging machine. The SPI Platform Scale Load cells were installed inside of the mount that attaches the head weigher to the packaging machine. Force results from the potato chips bag fill are read by the load cells and sent to the ISG Isolated DIN Rail Mount Signal Conditioner, where the customer was able to control the automated production from their command center.

The customer was able to determine the weight of the potato chips being distributed into their bags with highly accurate results. They also were able to control the automated production process with the provided instrumentation. They will use this same weighing method for other snacks that need to be packaged.

To learn more about Interface solutions designed for the modern factory, or specifically the food and beverage industry, contact our expert application engineers.

Additional Packaging Application Note:

Candy Stamp Force Testing

Faces of Interface Featuring Garland Hawkins

Faces of Interface is an important series because it highlights the talented team members that keep Interface going strong. In this new ForceLeaders feature, we interviewed Garland Hawkins, our production planner for Interface’s most popular LowProfile load cells.  A key member of our operations and Navigators teams at Interface, this feature highlights Garland’s professional history and a few of the things he’s working on today.

Growing up in the home of a mechanical engineer, you are bound to develop a kinship with the engineering and manufacturing world. For Garland Hawkins, he remembers fondly the time spent with his father building and tinkering with different mechanical objects. While a career in the manufacturing industry wasn’t necessarily planned, he’s thrilled that it’s where his career has taken him.

Garland’s path to the manufacturing industry is a little different than his father’s trek. After high school, Garland’s career began in the logistics industry as an order filler for Lineage Logistics. He enjoyed the work and quickly showed off his talents rising through the ranks over six years from order filler to trainer and eventually the supervisor. After leaving Lineage, Garland continued his career in logistics as the shipping and receiving manager for S&G.

After two years at S&G, Garland was ready for a change of scenery. He had spent his whole life in California and wanted something new. In 2016, Garland moved to Arizona because he preferred the desert landscape and knew that growth opportunities in Arizona were on the rise. Garland began working at the airport for a consolidation company, but he knew it was just a temporary gig before getting back into the field he knew and loved of logistics.

Then an opportunity came about with Interface. Garland began with Interface in the shipping and receiving department. As he became acclimated and comfortable in this new role in the engineering and manufacturing industry, he caught his stride. Shortly after, Garland was recognized for his hard work with a promotion into the planning department and eventually into his current role as Production Planner for Interface’s LowProfile Load Cell line.

In this role, Garland is tasked with managing the supply chain and planning. Basically, everything related to shipping and logistics for LowProfile Load Cell products. This includes, monitoring parts, maintaining inventory, addressing works orders with the production floor, scheduling machine shop and production orders and aligning capacity with customer demands and requirements.

Garland notes what he loves about Interface is the opportunity for success within the company. Most importantly, Interface is hyper-focused on growing into new markets and new regions and Garland knows that this will translate to career growth and opportunities to contribute to the company’s growth.

In addition to taking advantage of opportunities to grow at Interface, Garland is also working on his own to grow his skillset and knowledge during his time at Interface. Garland recently completed his degree in Operation Management and Analysis at Ashford University.

Garland’s drive and hunger are certainly not lost on Interface either. The company recognized this ambition and nominated Garland into its prestigious cross-functional Navigators program, which is designed to take rising stars and put them through development activities that expose them to every department of the company. This working team is essential in providing ideas and plans to drive positive change with critical thinking and problem-solving throughout the company. Garland is thankful for this opportunity because it provides the ability to see the company from every angle. It is helping him better understand the impact and importance of his own role while giving him insight on growth opportunities within the company.

While he’s not working at Interface, Garland likes to relax by enjoying his relatively new hometown of Phoenix, Arizona. He’s recently taken interests in hiking and exploring the outdoors in the desert. He’s also a big sports fan, especially basketball. He enjoys playing and watching NBA games while checking out the local food scene. However, he has not adopted the Suns as his home team yet, he’s a loyal Lakers fan through and through.

We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to shed some light on one of our committed team members. Garland Hawkins is star in the making with plenty to offer and a drive to take action.