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Electric Vehicle Battery Load Testing Feature and Application

The demand for quality load cell sensors and testing technology solutions in the electric vehicle market is high. This extends into the innovations and testing related to electric vehicle batteries. Design engineers and automotive manufacturers are looking for ways to extend the life of the EV battery, while also seeking ways to maximize overall vehicle performance.

Interface application engineers have been working to provide standard and custom solutions to EV battery manufacturers and testing labs for R&D, prototyping, and performance monitoring. It has sparked recent publications to reach out to Interface to discuss the types of force measurement devices that are being used, along with supportive instrumentation for various tests related to the electric vehicle market.

We’ve captured one of these use cases in the new application note, Electric Vehicle Structural Battery Testing.

The initial requirements for this application were to validate structural battery pack design, both in terms of life expectancy against design targets as well as crash test compliance and survivability.  Interface recommended utilizing 1100 Ultra-Precision LowProfile Load Cells in-line with hydraulic or electromechanical actuators within a structural test stand. The 6-Axis Load Cells were used to capture reactive forces transmitting through pack structure. These multi-axis sensors provide more measurement data and brings greater system level insight and improved product success. Using this configuration, the tests performed using Interface’s force measurement products validated the battery packs strong structural design. Read more here.

Recently we shared our experience in working with companies to provide load cells for testing batteries.  The details of this interview with DesignNews are highlighted in a brief excerpt below. Read the entire article here.

BATTERY LOAD TESTING PRESENTS NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR INTERFACE

By Dan Carney at DesignNews

The Arizona force management specialist is finding new opportunities for its load cells testing batteries.  In addition to measuring the strength of the battery case, it is also important for automakers to measure the pressure of the cells inside the case. In both situations, force management solutions from Interface, Inc. (Scottsdale, Arizona) are beneficial.

“FEA and computerized modeling get the customer most of the way there,” observed Interface vice president of global sales Brian Peters in a phone interview with Design News. “Automotive OEMs are spending more time on various structural development testing,” he said. “They are push-pull, multi-axis similar to what we see with aerospace fuselage testing.”

This is important because, in addition to the torsional loads normally applied to the battery box in the course of normal driving, there is also the need to model for worst-case crash scenarios.

“You have basic (noise, vibration, and harshness) torsional rigidity requirements, but then you have the crash requirements,” Peters noted. “How do you model, test, and have successful test results? When you run the full system into the barrier, sometimes the outcome is hard to model.”

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Feature Article Highlights Interface Solutions for EV Battery Testing

EV Battery Testing Solutions Utilize Interface Mini Load Cells

Electric Vehicle Battery Monitoring

Interface Helps to Power the Electric Vehicle Market Forward

Test and Measurement for Electric Vehicles

Torque Measurement for Electric Vehicles App Note

The Future of Automotive is Electric

Feature Article Highlights Interface Solutions for EV Battery Testing

In the recent article, Force sensors find opportunity in electric vehicles, battery assembly by Dan O’Shea of Fierce Electronics, the feature details increasing use of force measurement technologies in the EV industry.

In this must-read piece, Brian Peters was interviewed to share Interface’s role and growing support for the testing of electric vehicle components including electric vehicle battery testing.

In the article, the author highlights the different use cases for sensor technologies in the EV market. Interface shared our experience in supplying vehicle force measurement solutions for EV batteries chemical mixing, batch weighing scales, battery assembly machines, tension monitoring, material tests, structural tests and more.

Dan writes, “In the automotive sector, one of the most important areas where force sensor technology can play a role is in the manufacturing of electric vehicle batteries, as well as testing and monitoring batteries for quality assurance.”

He continues, “Brian Peters, vice president of global sales at Interface Force Measurement Solutions, told Fierce Electronics that the need for force sensors in EV battery applications has grown rapidly as more new automakers and battery manufacturers have appeared on the scene and consumer interest in EVs has risen.”

An example of one of these applications is detailed in use case of Electric Vehicle Battery Monitoring.

ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY MONITORING

Interface’s customer was designing a system to monitor lithium-batteries used in electric vehicles. Typically, lithium-batteries are measured through ICV to monitor and analyze life and performance. Interface suggested using our LBM Compression Load Button Load Cell in between two garolite end plates, and measuring the force that is created from cell swelling or expansion. Instead of monitoring through voltage (ICV), this method is based on measured force (ICF). Paired with the 9330 Battery Powered High Speed Data Logging Indicator, force results can be displayed, recorded, and logged with supplied software. 

Additional Resources

Interface Automotive Force Measurement Solutions

Automotive + Vehicle Brochure

Advancing Auto Testing with Interface Measurement Solutions

Torque Measurement for Electric Vehicles App Note

Interface Helps to Power the Electric Vehicle Market Forward

The Future of Automotive is Electric

Test and Measurement for Electric Vehicles

 

 

I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? Episodes 3 and 4

Continuing our review of the popular webinar series, I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What?, we are detailing the third and fourth episodes. The focus of these two installments is documentation that you should expect with every load cell and the fundamentals of load cell output.

Digging into documentation is an important subject for anyone that is buying or using load cells for test and measurement. It is also a differentiator in the quality and type of manufacturer that makes your device. The details provided in load cell documentation validates the characteristics and performance, as well as experience and craftmanship used in the engineering and construction of your load cell.

When quality and accuracy matters, documentation and certification are critical verification evidence.

Load Cell Documentation: Datasheets and Calibration Certificates

Interface provides detailed datasheets for every load cell model number. On the top of the datasheet, the Interface model number precedes the description of the load cell’s primary characteristics, such as 1200 Standard Load Cell. The Interface Calibration Certification accompanies every sensor device we manufacturer and ship from our U.S. headquarters, confirming the final condition prior to release. Interface calibrates every load cell we make before it leaves our facilities as part of our performance guarantee.

INTERFACE DATASHEET FUNDAMENTALS

  • Features and Benefits
  • Standard Configuration and Drawings
  • Dimensions
  • Specification Parameters Based on Model and Capacity
  • Detailed Measurement and Performance Data for Accuracy, Temperature, Electrical and Mechanical
  • Options
  • Connection Options
  • Accessories

Special note for datasheet reviews, the models that use the same form factor are often on the same datasheet with varying capacity measuring ranges in U.S. (lbf) and Metric (kN) information.  All Interface datasheets are available for review and download for every product we offer, including load cells, torque transducers, multi-axis sensors, mini load cells, load pins and load shackles, instrumentation and accessories.

INTERFACE CALIBRATION CERTIFICATES DETAILSIQ

  • Model Number
  • Serial Number
  • Bridge and Capacity
  • Procedures
  • Input and Output Resistance
  • Zero Balance
  • Test Conditions: Temperature, Humidity and Excitation
  • Traceability
  • Shunt Calibration
  • Performance Test Data of Test Load Applied and Recorded Readings
  • Authorized Approval

The performance information detailed on the certificate is important for how it was calibrated, how it performed at release, system health checks and troubleshooting. Watch the episode #3 of I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? for additional information about datasheets and cal certs.

Fundamentals of Load Cell Output

Load cells are used in one of two ways, either universal (bipolar) or single mode (unipolar). Bipolar is for measuring tension and compression. Unipolar is for measuring either tension or compression. This use type will dictate what output you will get from the load cell. Most Interface load cells are a tension upscale device, which means you will get a positive output when it is placed in tension.

Standard load cells are usually unamplified mV/V ratio metric output. Interface does offer amplification signals for our load cells, which is a common request when pairing with a data acquisition system. In episode #4 of I’ve Got A Load Cell – Now What?, Elliot provides an example of mV/V ratio metric when using a 5000 lbf LowProfile Load Cell with our 9840 Instrumentation.

For questions about datasheets, calibration certifications or performance and capacities, please contact our application engineers.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Interface 1200 Precision LowProfile Load Cell Series Product Highlight

Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part One

Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part Two

Understanding Load Cell Temperature Compensation

Load Cell Basics Sensor Specifications

 

I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? Episodes 1 and 2

Interface has produced more than 100 videos, all available on our Interface YouTube channel.  We provide product videos, industry and application use cases, training, software, and set-up instructions, ForceLeaders webinars, and video discussions with our force measurement solutions experts.

One of our most popular videos is our webinar that answers the question, I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? In this online seminar, we discuss some of the basics about load cells, as well as offer tips for checking the health of your load cell, installation tips, usage best practices and monitoring performance.  The series concludes with an in-depth Q&A session. As with all good material, we offer a modern remake to this valuable online resource with a refreshed 7-part series that addresses important load cell topics with visual demonstrations.

In the updated series, I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What, Interface’s Brian Peters and Elliot Speidell cover the following load cell basic topics:

  • Episode #1 Visual Inspection of Your Load Cell
  • Episode #2 How to Read the Load Cell Label
  • Episode #3 Load Cell Documentation: Datasheets and Calibration Certificates
  • Episode #4 Fundamentals of Load Cells
  • Episode #5 Load Cell Instrumentation Tips and Setup
  • Episode #6 Checking Load Cell Health and Usage Best Practices for LowProfiles, SM S-Type Load Cells and Miniature WMC Load Cells
  • Episode #7 Q&A with Brian and Elliot address incoming questions on what to do

Over the next several weeks, we’ll be highlighting some of the material that is covered in these short clips.  Today’s focus is about visual inspection and how to read a load cell label.

Visual Inspection of Your Load Cell

Visual inspection is critical for all load cells. The good news is that Interface provides quality-controlled inspection of all load cells before they leave our factory. If you are about to utilize a load cell that you have had on the shelf or has not been used for a while, visual inspection is an important first step. In this video, Brian highlights what to look for during your inspection:

  • Thread damage
  • Condition of the exterior load cell
  • Noticeable wear from exposure
  • Check for any rust
  • Inspect connectors and pins

Watch I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? Begin with Visual Inspection


Upon your inspection, if you would like Interface to provide a detailed inspection and calibration service before you utilize an existing sensor, contact our services team.

How to Read Interface Load Cell Labels

In this short episode, we highlight how to read an Interface load cell label. Every device we manufacturer has essential information about the sensor detailed on the label. You will find the model number, capacity, serial number and often you find options and option codes that detail the exact sensor features. Labels can also provide output data from time of calibration. To get a complete run-down on what is on Interface labels, watch I’ve Got a Load Cell – Now What? Reading Interface Sensor Labels.

Looking for more videos or resources, be sure to go to Interface’s online support resources. You will find diagrams, installation manuals, technical and troubleshooting details, educational videos and more.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Interface Presents Load Cell Basics
Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part One
Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part Two
Get an Inside Look at Interface’s Famously Blue Load Cells

Recap of Accurate Report on Calibration

Interface recently hosted an in-depth discussion on the topic of calibration.  As one of the largest calibration labs in the world for force and torque sensors, our team shared insider tips, frequently asked questions, set up techniques and best practices in the lab during this extensive calibration webinar.

The ForceLeaders seminar also covered details about various calibration grade equipment like our 1800 Platinum Standard® Calibration LowProfile® Load Cell, 1600 Gold Standard® Calibration LowProfile® Load Cell, fixtures, load frames, and calibration systems.  We also delved into topics that include instrumentation, verification frames and software.

During the event, we covered a diverse set of subjects due to the range of experiences of our attendees including the top five reasons why calibration matters, the measurement of uncertainty, identifying errors and the parameters of calibration.

You will find the recorded event Accurate Report on Calibration is available to review the technical details related to each of these important calibration subjects.

Elliot Speidell, Brian Peters and Chris Brandenburg covered a wide range of topics, including:

  • The Metrology Perspective
  • Interface Calibration Methodology: What, Why & How
  • Top 5 Reasons Why Calibration Matters
  • Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty
  • What Errors are Characterized in the Calibration Process?
  • System Calibration Considerations
  • Calibration Lab Set Up Best Practices + Tips
  • Optimization + Calibration Applications
  • Fixtures + Standard Equipment
  • Interface Calibration Services
  • Do & Don’t Tips + FAQ

To get things started, we began the event with a quick conversation about metrology, the science of measurement, which embraces both experimental and theoretical determinations at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology.

Metrology is the global network standardizing measurement units. Calibration is the action taken at each step in the metrology network.

Metrology is important to Interface because it provides the standards for controlled processes, systems, reliability, accuracy, quality and science. Calibration is the set of operations that compares the accuracy of a measuring instrument of any type, such as a load cell or torque transducer, against a recognized standard. The process of calibration includes adjusting the measuring instrument to bring it in alignment with the standard.

Why is calibration of load cells and torque transducers important?

  • All load cells are subject to performance degradation due mistreatment, drift, or aging
  • You need traceability and quality system requirements
  • Pre and post-test verification is critical for data validity
  • Even load cells manufactured to the highest standards require regular calibration

Interface calibrates every load cell and torque transducer to spec before it leaves our facility. We also provide recalibration services for all types of devices, even those we don’t manufacturer. This results in more than 100,000 calibrations every year by our trained technicians. During this event we shared valuable tips for setting up and operating a world-class calibration lab.

Best practices for calibration labs:

  • Define workspace requirements
  • Qualify measurement types and models
  • Identify suppliers
  • Select calibration grade equipment
  • Assemble lab
  • Train lab techs
  • Create certification and testing protocols
  • Define workflows
  • Utilize software for tracking assets and certificates
  • Know maintenance and recalibration schedules

The Accurate Report on Calibration recorded event is available online to watch at your convenience.

If you need help in defining the best calibration grade systems or equipment for your specific test environment, contact our application engineers.  If you need a calibration service, you can submit your request online.

Fine-Tuning Testing Solutions for Championship Racing Vehicles

As every championship race car team looks to find its competitive advantage, measured in seconds, Interface continues to play a pivotal role in ensuring accurate force measurement solutions are used to test the limits of every component used in motorsports.

The automotive industry has long depended on the quality and accuracy of Interface load cells, torque transducers, instrumentation, and multi-axis sensors.  Did you know it is also used in the competitive arena of auto racing?  Performance demands are constantly being pushed for all types of racing machines, whether it’s for NASCAR, IndyCar, or even the amateur level racing. What is known in the racing community is that engineers and manufacturers of equipment and parts used in these high-performance vehicles rely on Interface for precision testing solutions.

In our new case study, Building a Championship Race Car, we detail some of the specific sensor technologies used in the racing arena for high performance testing. We highlight how Interface’s TXY 2-Axis Load Cell is used in testing tires. Leading tire manufacturers, including SCCA sponsors, utilize these sensors to get precise test data on tire uniformity. The TXY has minimal cross talk across its strain gage bridges, ideal for this type of testing.

We also detail how our top load cell, the LowProfile, is frequently used in testing shocks, springs, and struts.  With any racing vehicle, control is fundamental, and the equipment used to maintain that control must be proven to meet the exceptionalism and requirements of racing professionals and their teams.

In this technical article, learn how the popular AxialTQ Torque Transducer, a bearing-less, compact wireless design, affords the test engineer suitable data collection for engine analysis, as well as brake HP calculations for active performance testing.

A competitive spirit runs deep within our Interface team, it’s what we do. We like to ensure our products are top class and help our customers win!  We also have first-hand experience in how our products are used in the racing arena. That experience affirms the positive performance effects of force measurement in auto racing.

Did you know that Interface’s Vice President of Sales, Brian Peters, has accomplished eight National Championships in Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) solo racing, and also competes in the One Lap of America cross-country, weeklong multi-competition racing event?

The annual SCCA National Championships draws more than 1,000 drivers from across North America to compete over two days. Wins are decided by mere thousandths of a second. Knowing how our products are used in high-performance racing environments, only fuels us more.

Performance and precision are critical and Interface force measurement solutions help to fine-tune critical racing vehicles, parts, and apparatus used to test different components in motorsports. We also like to say, it’s a competitive advantage. Read our case study to learn more.

Additional Resources

Powered by Interface Race Update from Brian Peters

Race Car Suspension Testing

Driving Force in Automotive Applications

Automotive and Vehicle

Embedding Sensors in Products

Interface recently hosted a conversation about embedding sensors into products and components. Our OEM solutions experts Randy White and Brian Peters discussed the process of engaging Interface to help with design, engineering, building and testing using our specialty load cells and torque transducers. We build to your specifications. Learn how to get started in this detailed event about OEM market solutions.

Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part Two

Interface hosted a series of ForceLeaders webinars this past year covering topics that included multi-axis sensors, instrumentation, torque transducers, custom solutions and more.  We plan to continue this popular series into the new year, based on the feedback we have received about topics of interest and support requirements.

One of the features that we like to include in our events is answering a list of top questions, as well as questions we get from the participants.  In our event, Load Cell Basics, we covered a lot of interesting inquiries as well as the top questions we get about our precision load cell products.

We highlighted the first group of questions in our recent post, Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part One. And there is more, below highlights additional questions we addressed during the live event.   A recap of the webinar is also online, reviewing key topics we discussed during the one-hour learning event with force measurement experts Keith Skidmore and Brian Peters.

Is There a Better Way to Tare a Load Cell?

Tare is defined as a deduction from the gross weight of a substance and its container made in allowance for the weight of the container, which is sometimes also called the vessel.  For purposes of this reference, we are noting the container is the actual body of the load cell.

Whether you tare a load cell by electronics or mechanical, preload taring of the system is typically done through instrumentation.  You want to ensure that whatever mechanical tare load you have on the sensor isn’t going to impede on your usable capacity range. As far as the load cell is concerned, there really is no need to accommodate any sort of mechanical tare. These are linear devices if you stay within the range.  On the mechanical preload side, it is important how you preload some of attachments especially for the LowProfile load cells. We recommend to preload if you can. It is what we do for best results so that the load path doesn’t change through the threads, which can affect very small amounts of linearity hysteresis

Does Frequency Measurement Limit Impact How Fast the Load Cell Responds?

This is a function of the mechanical flexure design for that sensor. It is important to note that each sensor is a mechanical spring. Depending on the stiffness or the deflection characteristics of a load cell, you will have different natural frequency characteristics. This information is typically documented on our product data sheets by model and configuration.  Generally, the stiffer the sensor the better it’s going to perform in cyclic applications.

Adding to this, Keith notes that load cells are great at hundreds of hertz. If you are asking about tens of thousands of hertz, they are not. There is a spot where very high frequencies of these standard load cells aren’t as effective. Most of our typical testing customers who are applying cyclical loads to a test specimen will confirm that low profile or strain gage-based load cells are great for their frequency requirements.  Work with our application engineers if you have a frequency requirement that is extremely high.

Tare and Working Up an Error Budget

This question comes in from an engineer that is working up a calculated error budget that has a mechanical tare load on that system already. Before you start your test, if you tare it how does that factor into your initial preload in the system? Will it impact your error budget? The answer is that yes, it can have some impact. You can zero out your temperature effect on zero; however, if you have a lot of preloads, you can’t. You must go back to zero to zero it out. This can impact your error budget. Basically, if you zero out, it eliminates the temperature effect. You cannot make the same assumption in your budget if you have considerable preloads.

Does Interface Recommend Particular Amplifier Instrumentation Products?

We do have a wide variety of amplifier solutions. They range from small embeddable amplifiers up to inline options that are DIN rail mounted.  We also have various digital output instrumentation productions available for ethernet, ether cat, Modbus, and USB.

It is important in your consideration to understand that there are errors that can impact instrumentation performance. Selecting the right instrumentation should be a function of the application and what are the changes in testing environment. Resolution is critical in your decision if you are doing a digital type conversion. There’s a lot of parameters to consider. Our recommendation would be to look at what is available from Interface and contact our application engineers to review your specific requirements.

What is the Most Frequent Problem When Installing a Load Cell?

One of the issues are asked about is usually related to the mechanical installation. It’s not as simple as just a nut, bolt, and threaded connection. There is a lot more to it and it’s often and discounted how important it is to ensure things are aligned properly so that you don’t have any parallel load paths. All the load must go through the load cell to make a proper measurement. For example, if you have a mounting plate and the plates are riding on the heads of the screws of the load cell, it is going to shunt the load. Mechanical installation is often missed in the test set-up design. It is often not given enough weight in importance of your test.

We also often see that users have either inadequate torque in an assembly or perhaps too much torque for the lower capacity load cells.  It’s advised to be careful of the installation torque. We recommend that if you aren’t familiar with mechanical installation, ask us for our detailed installation instructions. We provide guidance in terms of recommended torque values and proper methods of where to attach the sensor. It’s easy to over torque a load cell, as they are designed to see axial loads. We have seen users people crank on things and transmitting too much torsional load through creating performance issues that might not show up right away.

Do Cables and Amplifiers Affect Results of Load Cell Calibration?

The answer is absolutely it can impact your results. It doesn’t mean it will, but it can affect performance and measurement accuracy. For example, if you change the cable length or have an instrument that is a different temperature with cable running out of an oven into cooler temperature room, these things can influence the measurement. Even if the load cell is at a constant temperature but the cable is changing temperature, it will cause a signal to change. That’s not something you want in your measurement.

You may mitigate temperature by shielding the cable or you could have a fatter cable which could have less of an effect. Some of these things can be calibrated out. If you add a long cable and then apply loads to your load cell, it considers that there is a longer cable, and you can completely calibrate out the effect of the cable length on the signal dropping due to the resistance. Some instruments use sense to measure the voltage at the load cell. In that case, it is insensitive to any cable effect. You can change cable lengths and it doesn’t make any difference.

Is a 10kn (2,250) lb. Force Application Too Much for a 2,000 lb. Load Cell?

Yes, it’s above the calibrated range and thus you can’t guarantee performance. Load cells will typically stay linear over capacity but there’s no guarantee on the accuracy. This is especially true if you overload with frequency. You’re starting to exercise the load cell in areas where we’d recommend you stay away from to keep the results accurate. Oftentimes, you’re better off going with a larger sensor. Pay attention to the actual output. That’s one advantage of most of our products, especially in the LowProfile range.

Is There Maximum Sampling Frequency for Strain Gage Load Cells?

It is going to depend somewhat on the model of the load cell. Hundreds of hundreds of hertz are certainly adequate. If you start getting close to the natural frequency posted on our product data sheet, we recommend you review the application with our application engineers.

We know engineers who use load cells for safety impact testing. For example, you might need to sample 10 kilohertz. The load cell doesn’t make a difference for how fast you sample the signal, but those cells can only respond in typically a millisecond response time. There are no moving parts or active circuitry; however, typically testing is going to test something until it fails. It is suggested to sample it at a couple thousand hertz to make sure you capture that exact point where the system fails or spikes. If you do have some concern over creep error that’s introduced, record what that non-zero value is as soon as you release that load. That is an accurate measurement of how much creep error was introduced being symmetric.

We exercise our load cells before calibration. It’s relatively quick and typically done in hydraulic frames which are automated to test where they cycle the load in short cycle intervals, like 30 seconds. It’s really the magnitude of the exercising, not how long it lasts. If load is being tested at 120% for an hour, that’s no better than 10 seconds, other than it introduced a lot of creep for an hour. Exercising means you must wait longer for the creep to return, so if the load is a fast cycle, you can check the zero quickly.

If you have additional questions for our experts, we recommend that you visit our technical support resources. We have commonly asked questions, installation guides and manuals and more.  We are also here to support you. Contact our technical support team if you need assistance.

Additional Resources

 

Load Cell Field Guide

Load Cell Basics Sensor Specifications

Load Cell Basics Technical Q&A Part One

Interface 1200 Precision LowProfile Load Cell Series Product Highlight

New Interface White Paper Highlights Turning an Active Component into a Sensor

The most common uses of force measurement in OEM (original equipment manufacturer) applications are when a force sensor is designed into a product that will be produced at mid to high volumes and provides real-time force feedback on certain product functions in use. Utilizing sensors as a feature enables data acquisition over time to monitor forces and understand how those forces effect product efficiency, safety, quality or all of these performance metrics. This ultimately is used to design a better product, in the current state and for future enhancements or to know when a product is performing best or risks breaking down.

Did you know that there is another application of force sensors in OEM applications that is playing a large role in the factory of the future? This is when we turn an active component into a sensor and use that data to create automated actions. This solution is used when there is a desire to take a moving component within a system and make it smarter, ultimately allowing it to make data-based decisions on its own.

For example, the manufacturing industry is using force sensors on machines within a production line that are responsible for picking components up for visual inspection. The sensor is integrated into the grabbing component and can tell the machine the exact force to use when picking up the component as not to damage it. This is a critical capability when dealing with expensive and delicate components that can break under too much force. In the past, a force measurement sensor would have been used only to test this functionality. When the sensor is designed directly into the machine, the user can both test beforehand and monitor and automate processes in real-time.

The need for this type of capability is growing rapidly amongst manufacturers across a wide variety of industry including aerospace and defense, industrial, medical, automotive, industrial automation, assembly and more. To further outline the potential for these types of solutions, Interface developed a new white paper that details  how sensor solutions for OEMs work with specific examples of the benefit of turning an active component into a sensor.

Included below is a brief intro to the recently released white paper. Get your copy by clicking on the link here. Additionally, if you’re interested in learning more about Interface solutions for OEM applications go here, or call us to speak to our OEM application experts at 480-948-5555. Ready to get started, let us know how we can help here.

WHITE PAPER EXCERPT

OEM SOLUTIONS: TURNING AN ACTIVE COMPONENT INTO A SENSOR

The age of industrial automation and big data is upon us. Manufacturers that fall behind in equipping their facilities and products with innovation that allows for automated processes, remote monitoring and better efficiency through technology, will quickly fall behind. This is due to the fact that automation helps to significantly improve process quality because it eliminates human error. It also creates long-term cost savings by speeding up several processes, or by helping to monitor products in use and in real-time to optimize performance and stability over time through better data collection.

Get your copy of the white paper to read more.

Special note, contributors to the white paper are Interface and sensor engineering experts, Brian Peters and Rob Fuge.

Additional Resources for OEM

Interface is a Critical Solutions Provider for OEMs

Making the Case for Custom Solutions Webinar Recap