Posts

Regular Calibration Service Maintains Load Cell Accuracy

Even under ideal conditions with normal use, some new load cells can exhibit a slight improvement in accuracy over a period of time. In contrast, load cells are subject to performance degradation due mistreatment, drift, or aging. Throughout the life of a load cell, Interface recommends that regularly scheduled calibration and inspection to monitor performance and minimize uncertainty.

Calibration is a set of operations that compares the accuracy of a measuring instrument of any type, such as a load cell or torque transducer, against a recognized standard. It is often referenced as load cell characterization.

Calibration service ensures the transducer is performing to listed specification. It helps to avoid costly impacts resulting from invalid data or a load cell shutting down a test in progress. Confidence in data is critical in test and measurement. The calibration assures that measurements gathered within the valid calibration period are reliable, trustworthy, and defensible. To maintain  any sensor and minimize cost of poor quality, it is best practice that calibrations are scheduled annually to confirm accuracy to specifications.

There are times when loading conditions and use case environments necessitate the need for more frequent evaluation and calibration cycles. The process of calibration can include adjusting the measuring instrument to bring it in alignment with the standard.

Use Cases for Frequent Calibration Services

  • Harsh environmental conditions can cause corrosion and electrical failures
  • Loading forces that exceed the load cell rated capacity can cause shifting of the zero-load output of the load cell
  • Moment loading of the load cell can cause zero shifts and other undesirable behavior
  • High cycle rates or fatigue applications can cause premature failure

Many of these symptoms can be repaired or mitigated if they are identified early during appropriate evaluation and calibration cycles.

Interface standards for calibration are world-class. Our calibration labs are managed by experts in diagnostics, testing and repair with engineering and metrology grade equipment designed by the leaders in force measurement. Interface’s range of calibration service capabilities:

FORCE

  • NMI Traceable Calibration
  • 50g – 1 Million lbf Capacities
  • 11 Hydraulic and 6 Dead Weight Test Stands to Support Calibration Demand

TORQUE

  • .022 – 100K in lbf Capacities
  • NIST Traceable to 2.2K in lbf
  • NMI Traceable 2.2K – 100K in lbf

Why Interface Calibration Services?

  • ISO 17025 Accredited
  • 50+ Years of Calibration Experience
  • 100,000+ Calibrations Performed Annually
  • Permanently Archived Test Data
  • Highly Trained Professional Technicians
  • Quick and Timely Response
  • Calibrations Running 24/6

Our guidance is to schedule regular maintenance with an annual check-up. Interface offers world-class diagnostic, repair, and calibration services. You can schedule your calibration service online here.

 

Back to School Force Measurement Essentials

Interface has a long history of collaborating with colleges and universities around the world. From individual engineering students testing the force of launching miniature rockets to supplying onsite test labs with load cells and equipment for R&D, we are a resource for higher education learning and experimentation.

In our view, innovation and exploration have no boundaries. What validates new ideas and manifests problem solving requires modern and reliable tools that support student’s projects and activities. Its key to any program’s success. It is also why we are proud to be known around the globe as a leader in building and designing force measurement products that facilitate these initiatives through higher learning.

It is very inspiring to see new engineering students, future metrologists, and soon-to-be graduates designing new medical devices, creating new spacecraft and interplanetary vehicles, testing materials used for miniature consumer products and of course, building plenty of new robots and AI machines.

In our view, every university or college should have Interface force measurement products on hand to support these types of educational test and measurement research projects. Here is a simplified list of basic sensor products to get started.

Force Measurement Essentials for Higher Learning

  • Precision load cells in diverse designs and capacities
  • S-type load cells (load beams)
  • Miniature load cells and load buttons
  • Multi-axis sensors
  • Calibration grade equipment
  • Instrumentation
  • Wireless sensor technologies
  • Rotary and reaction torque transducers
  • Verification load frames

Our investment in supporting educational programs runs deep into our history as a company. You will find our founder’s name on the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab at The University of Arizona. Following in his commitment to education, the Richard F. Caris Charitable Trust II continues to support STEM programs including sponsorship of the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF).

We drive to ensure that students who have a passion for science, technology and engineering have access to the best force measurement sensor technologies. It is why we offer a standard discount to all students and education institutions. You can learn more about our education support here. We know that learning requires the best tools, and we want to make sure that every student has the most accurate, quality and precision load cells available today.

As with all inquisitive minds, we thought it would be interesting to share what are other university and colleges buying for their learning programs and campus labs.

Top 10 products for testing projects and campus lab studies:

  1. 1200 LowProfile Load Cells are our most popular load cell, available in standard and high-capacity features.
  2. 1010 Load Cell model is a fatigue-rated low profile load cell in our 1000 product family, offering various capacities and functions.
  3. 2420 Load Cell is one of our stainless-steel standard and high-capacity load cells in our 2400 model series.
  4. 1500 Low-Capacity Load Cell designs are common requirements for applications where low sensitivity to eccentric load is important.
  5. WMC Sealed Stainless Steel Miniature Load Cell has an environmentally protected construction that comes in a variety of model capacities and configurations. It is great for small spaces and industrial applications.
  6. 3-Axis Load Cells are extremely popular multi-axis sensors designed to provide more testing data and often paired with BSC4 instrumentation. They are ideally suited for aerospace, robotics, automotive, and medical research testing applications.
  7. 6-Axis Load Cells are growing in popularity, for cost benefit and their unique ability to simultaneously measure Fx Fy Fz Mx My Mz.
  8. SSM Miniature Load Cells are one of many popular general-purpose s-type designed load cells. You call learn more about all our s-type models here.
  9. Torque Transducers of all types are used by university programs, engineering departments and metrology labs. There are many different options including rotary and reaction torque solutions. For all options, start here to choose the right one.
  10. Load Washer Load Cells are used because of the unique through-hole designs. They come in various models and dimensions, along with capacity options.

As with any project, the questions of what you want to measure, the applications, and where you are sending the data, are all core to choosing the sensor and instrumentation that is best suited for the learning environment or program.

Speaking of where to send the data for performance monitoring and analysis, the five most favorite types of instrumentation selected by university students and engineering labs include:

  1. DMA2 Signal Conditioner
  2. 9840 4-Channel Intelligent Indicator
  3. 9825 General Purpose Indicator
  4. BX8-AS BlueDAQ Series Data Acquisition System
  5. SGA AC/DC POWERED SIGNAL CONDITIONER

If you are heading back to school and thinking that it is time to revamp the testing lab or need new force measurement equipment, be sure to reach out to our education application engineers. They have years of experience and can help you get exactly what you need for your project and programs.

Be sure to tune into our Load Cell Basics, for answer to common questions about using these highly accurate sensors for your test and measurement projects. You can find all our Interface videos on our YouTube channel here.

If you are looking to explore more technical resources, be sure to go to our online support area and subscribe to our blogs for weekly updates.

ADDITIONAL EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

Types of Force Measurement Tests 101

Torque Transducers 101

Multi-Axis Sensors 101

S-Type Load Cells 101

Mini Load Cells 101

Force Measurement Instrumentation 101

Load Washers 101

Couplings 101

Load Shackles 101

Load Pins 101

Tension Links 101

Load Button Load Cells 101

Strain Gages 101

Load Cell 101 and What You Need to Know

Calibration Systems 101

Force Measurement Accessories 101

TEDS 101

Shunt Calibration 101

 

Faces of Interface Featuring Sean Malone

In today’s Faces of Interface, we talked with Sean Malone who is responsible for calibrating and repairing our customer’s force measurement equipment. As our esteemed warranty coordinator, his important role requires extensive knowledge of force measurement technologies. This is because not only do we support the products we make, we also calibrate and repair force measurement products from a wide variety of other manufacturers.

Throughout his life, Sean has always had a propensity for working with his hands. Hi family owned a locksmith business, so he grew up to become very mechanically proficient. In fact, Sean worked for the 35-year family-run business for 25 years before the family decided to sell it. Sean also went to school at ITT Tech during that time and received his associates in computer networking and science.

After leaving the locksmith business, Sean investigated a new role where he could continue to work with his hands every day. This desire led him to Interface. He began his career at Interface as a repair technician in our production facility, then he moved on to become a calibration finalist, and the manager of the service department before settling into his current role as warranty coordinator.

His journey through Interface’s service department gave him a great deal of knowledge about the business and the ins and outs of a load cell. This allows him to perform his current role to the highest degree and aptitude. He’s also a great resource for questions and support for our team members and global network. His position today includes being a single point contact for service customers, performing root cause analysis, fixing load cells, calibrating them, and ensuring items sent in for services get back to the customer in premium working order.

Sean says that he’s caught his professional stride at Interface and really enjoys the fact that he is learning something new every day. He also remarked that the people he comes to work with make the job and the company that much more enjoyable. We’re glad to have you here too Sean, as you represent the best in ForceLeaders.

In his free time, you won’t find Sean anywhere else but at the golf course. Being an Arizona native, he has grown up with a passion for the U.S. golf capitol of the world and all it has to offer for an avid golfer. His skills in the sport also extend to a little bit of frisbee golf from time to time. All things golf, all the time. That’s the way Sean winds down.

We’re incredibly honored to have Sean on the team and his work is critical to keeping our customers products operating at the highest standards of accuracy and reliability, today and for many years to come.

To learn more about the outstanding team at Interface, check in to our blog each month for our Faces of Interface series.

Top Five Reasons Why Calibration Matters

Applied metrology is the measurement science developed in relation to manufacturing and other processes, ensuring the suitability of measurement instruments, their calibration, and quality control.

Calibration is the practice of evaluating and adjusting equipment to ensure precision and accuracy. Calibration for force measurement determines whether a sensor is working properly, as well if it needs repair or replacement.

Calibration is critical in the application of test and measurement because it provides controlled methods using equipment and systems that ensure reliability, accuracy, and quality.

We recently shared in our Accurate Report on Calibration seminar, the top five reasons why calibration matters. Below highlights each why.

#1 Reason Why Calibration Matters – Understanding Uncertainty

  • Measurement uncertainty is defined as an estimate of the range of measured values within which the true value lies or, alternatively, the degree of doubt about a measured value.
  • In every application, there will be an uncertainty requirement on the force measurement.
  • The equipment used to make the measurement must be traceable to a realization of the SI Newton unit of force within this required uncertainty.

#2 Reason Why Calibration Matters – Quality and Specifications

  • Calibration ensures the transducer is performing to listed specification.
  • It avoids costly impacts or escapes to manufactured goods and products.
  • Maintaining quality of manufactured device to original specifications is an important reason why calibration matters.
  • It certainly minimizes the cost of poor quality.

#3 Reason Why Calibration Matters – Minimize Downtime

  • Proactive maintenance will always take less time than reactive problem solving and repairs.
  • Identify and repair or replace system components before they fail through regular calibration.
  • Plan calibration intervals to minimize downtime, as a schedule is preventative maintenance.

#4 Reason Why Calibration Matters – Data Accuracy

  • All load cells are subject to potential performance degradation due to mistreatment or drift, impacting data integrity.
  • Pre and post test verification provide assurances in data validity.
  • Confidence in critical measurements is imperative.

#5 Reason Why Calibration Matters – Accreditation and Certifications

  • Calibrations provide adherence to quality management systems and requirements, especially ISO certifications and compliance.
  • It assures that measurements gathered within the valid calibration period are reliable, trustworthy, and defensible.
  • Traceability of measurement is guaranteed with certifications.

To start, every sensor Interface manufactures is calibrated and certified in our fully accredited calibration labs before it leaves our facilities. We do so under ISO 17025 standards with full NIST traceability for quality assurance. Annually, we provide more than 100,000 calibrations on force and torque measurement devices.

We also provide complete calibration services and repair on any sensor we make, as well as other manufacturer’s equipment. Our experienced calibration lab technicians offer a complete range of calibration services for load cells, torque transducers and other force measurement devices, including:

  • Scheduled Repairs for Ongoing Inventory Management
  • RMA Tracking and Permanent Archive of Test Data
  • Custom Calibration Services
  • Certification

Calibration is a necessity as any product can degrade, resulting in a decline in accuracy. Interface recommends every device go through a calibration service annually to maintain the integrity of the sensor performance. If you need assistance in scheduling a calibration service or requesting help, contact us here.

We also offer a range of calibration grade equipment for labs and to use for self-service calibration.  This includes our verification load frames, calibration systems, calibration grade load cells and lab instrumentation. Read Calibration Grade Load Cells and Systems and Additional Interface Calibration Grade Solutions to learn about these and other products.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Recap of Accurate Report on Calibration

Interface Calibration 101

GS-SYS04 Gold Standard® Portable E4 Machine Calibration System

Shunt Calibration 101

Extending the Calibration Range of a Transducer

Calibration-and-Repair-Brochure-1

 

 

Exploring Interface Capabilities and Differentiators

Interface is the largest producer of load cells defined by a particularly important core differentiator. The Interface difference is precision.

How do we maintain this standard of excellence? Interface is directed by our foundational 4-pillars for success: quality, service, accuracy, and innovation. This applies to anything and everything that we do, including manufacturing premium force measurement products, engineering and design, custom solutions, providing calibration and repair, and in our commitment to service.

Interface has long been known for providing accuracy-based sensor technologies, innovative solutions, engineering excellence and quality products that our customers trust. We have detailed our breadth and depth of capabilities and differentiators for our products that are designed to serve customers across a growing number of industries.

In our online capabilities statement, you can find:

  • Interface differentiators
  • Interface core products and expertise
  • Certifications
  • Industry NAICS and PSC Codes
  • Interface’s Company Snapshot

Our customers around the world are innovators, market leaders, boundary-breaking, finding ways to do things differently, make things safer, improve products and create new all through the measurement of force. We provide solutions for test and measurement, as well as OEM. This includes companies in aerospace and defense, automotive and vehicle, medical devices, energy, industrial automation, entertainment and amusement, agriculture, maritime, infrastructure, and equipment manufacturing.

As world’s trusted leader in force measurement technology, design, and manufacturing, it is important that we guarantee the highest quality performance of load cells, torque transducers, multi-axis sensors, wireless telemetry, instrumentation, calibration and more. To do this, it is the Interface people, technology, manufacturing, engineering, and force measurement solutions that make the difference.

Here are just a few of Interface’s key differentiators and capabilities:

  • PROPRIETARY STRAIN GAGES: We make our strain gages and assemble them in the same buildings as our final sensor testing is performed in-house to ensure the quality and accuracy.
  • THE STANDARD: Interface is the standard for all load cells. Since 1968, our LowProfile® load cells have been used throughout the world because of their accuracy and dependability.
  • CALIBRATION: Our trademarked Gold Standard Calibration System is the industry ‘gold standard’ for test and measurement.
  • SYSTEMS: Interface is the only major load cell company offering a comprehensive system for customers to calibrate their own load cells.
  • CERTIFICATIONS: Every load cell we make is individually calibrated and tested through a series of performance tests before it leaves our facility.
  • STANDARD, ENGINEERED-TO-ORDER AND CUSTOM: We design and build our force measurement solutions, delivering the broadest variety of available options in the industry.
  • TEAM: Our team is an extended network of professionals that design, build, administer, sale and support our customers with the best force measurement solutions that fit their exact requirements based on expertise and experience.

You can see all the Interface differentiators in our capabilities statement.

We’ are proud of the Interface brand, our five-decade legacy as a leader in the industry and fact that we are a women-owned manufacturing company. We guarantee our products quality because every employee and partner take pride in our work. It is our dedication to deliver on our promise.

Capabilities-Statement

Types of Force Measurement Tests 101

There are distinct types of force tests that engineers, product designers, manufacturers, and test labs perform to accurately measure factors that control quality, safety, and reliability.

Testing force helps to qualify how something will react when applying load, either by a normal application or by pulling and pushing it fails. The type of force measurement classifications are compression, fracture, tension, flexure, and shear.

Interface provides a broad range of solutions for static and dynamic force measurement tests including standard and custom transducers, instrumentation, accessories, frames, calibration equipment and other components used for in force testing.

The most common categories of force testing include:

  • Tensile testing
  • Shear testing
  • Compression testing
  • Fatigue testing
  • Torque testing
  • Hardness testing
  • Static testing
  • Mechanical strength testing
  • Material testing
  • Proof load testing
  • End of line testing

There are variations to each of these test classifications, such as cycle testing is often a subset of fatigue and mechanical strength tests. Hardness testing is frequently referred to as nondestructive testing. Initial R&D tests typically center around choosing materials, strength and durability tests, compression ergonomic and abrasion tests.

Here are the general characterizations of the most popular types of force tests.

Tensile Test

Tensile strength is the ability of a metal to withstand a pulling apart tension stress. Performing a tensile test, sometimes referred to as tension testing, applies uniaxial load to a test bar and gradually increasing the load until it breaks. The measurement of the load is against the elongation using an extensometer. The tensile data is analyzed by using a stress-strain curve. Interface load cells are commonly used for various tensile tests when accuracy of measurement matters.

Compression Test

Compression is the result of forces pushing towards each other. The compression test is like the tensile test. Place the object in a testing machine, apply a load and record the deformation. A compressive stress-strain curve is drawn from the data. Interface provides load cells that measure compression-only or tension and compression measurements from the same device.

Torque Test

Torque measurement determines how an object will react when it is turned or twisted. There are two common use cases, fastening tests of objects or by testing rotating parts in an assembly. The two types of torque measurement are reaction and in-line, which are important when selecting the type of torque transducer to use in your test. The wrong torque can result in the assembly failing due to several problems, whether that is by torque testing bolts or engine parts. Parts may not be assembled securely enough for the unit to function properly, or threads may be stripped because the torque was too high, causing the unit to fail. Torque is a force producing rotation about an axis. This type of testing is also extremely popular in automotive to measure a variety of components.

Shear Test

Shear strength is the ability to resist a “sliding past” type of action when parallel, but slightly off-axis, forces, applied in the test. Shear force is directional force that is over the top of a surface or part. Shear is measured by tension or compression using a shear or bending beam load cell.

Hardness Test

Hardness testing, which measures the resistance of any material against penetration, is performed by creating an indentation on the surface of a material with a hard ball, a diamond pyramid or cone and then measuring the depth of penetration. Hardness testing is categorized as a non-destructive test since the indentation is small and may not affect the future usefulness of the material. There are a wide variety of hardness testing types as well.

Examples of Testing Types

Compression Test Example

Interface’s customer wanted to measure the amount of compression force a piece of candy could withstand to ensure its label is marked correctly. The purpose of the test was to correctly calibrate the equipment to provide the same stamping force each time without breaking the candy apart. An Interface Model WMC Mini Load Cell and 9330 Battery Powered High Speed Data Logging Indicator are used to measure the results. Read more about this compression test here.

Torque Measurement Example

In this example torque testing accurately measures the forced needed to securely fasten a bolt. This type of test is critical in highly regulated industries like aerospace and automotive to ensure every screw and bolt are not over or under-tightened. Interface’s LWCF Clamping Force Load Cell along with Interface’s INF-USB3 Universal Serial Bus Single Channel PC Interface Module provide a solution that monitors the force being applied during bolt tightening.

Shear Test Example

This example shows how aerospace manufactures use shear testing to measure the affects of wind as it moves past the wings, hull, and other components of a plane. Interface measured this force using a Model 6A154 6-Axis Load Cell mounted in the floor of the wind tunnel, and connected  to the scaled model by a “stalk”. A BX8-AS Interface BlueDAQ Series Data Acquisition System was connected to the sensor to collect data.

As products become more complex and technologically advanced, the test and measurement industry must provide solutions to monitor a wide variety of factors. This is no different in force measurement.

Interface has been involved in every type of force measurement type across a variety of applications both large and small. To learn more about our more than 36,000 product SKUs designed to conduct all these tests, from single load cells and torque transducers to complete testing rigs and systems. We also provide calibration services for all types of force measurement transducers. Contact us if you are unsure which force measurement solution best fits your testing plan.

Additional Resources

Tensile Testing for 3D Materials

Material Tensile Testing

Interface Solutions for Material Testing Engineers

Bike Handlebar Fatigue Testing

Interface Specializes in Fatigue-Rated Load Cells

Specifying Accuracy Requirements When Selecting Load Cells

Spring Compression Testing App Note

Insights in Torque Testing Featured in Quality Magazine

Interface Solutions are Designed and Built to Last

Interface was founded by a visionary and entrepreneur, Richard F. Caris, who believed that if you designed and built dependable, quality, and accurate products, you would also build a sustainable company that will last generations.

His passion is what drives Interface today, sustaining his legacy and commitment to design products that revolutionize industries around the world. Interface, now owned by his two daughters, is a women-owned manufacturing and technology company that started in a garage and now is one of Arizona’s most enduring businesses. The company, started in 1968, continues to maintain its headquarters and productions facilities in the heart of Scottsdale, Arizona.

Today, we are the trusted partner and supplier of global test and measurement solutions for testing labs and by makers of robots, rockets, medical devices, airplanes, industrial automation and farming equipment, new energy products, vehicles of all types, along with maritime and entertainment inventions.

Interface’s purpose is simple, we enable innovation that improves people’s lives and keeps them safe.

When it comes to building products that last, we are adamant about control and quality throughout entire process. Every stage, from design engineering, machining, strain gage manufacturing and assembly, our team works to ensure the highest degree of performance possible for everything we manufacture.

It is not uncommon for Interface to get service requests for products that we built decades ago, in fact several decades ago. It is the depiction of what Mr. Caris planned for, and what we continue to strive for every day. Interface is a company that offers products built to last.

Fundamental to Interface, made is the USA has long been a celebrated distinction of Interface’s core offerings, including our LowProfile Load Cells, known as the first precision pancake-styled low profile load cells on the market. In fact, Interface has been engineering force measurement solutions for more than 54 years and has more than 35,000 products to show for it.

Our dedication to our customers around the world to be a total solutions provider in force measurement has driven expansion of our core load cell and torque transducers to include an extensive line of multi-axis sensors, miniature load cells, instrumentation, accessories, custom solutions, OEM products and engineered to order designs.

What makes Interface different? Our core differentiator is precision. We are known for providing high accuracy, innovative solutions, engineering excellence, and quality products that our customers trust.

Additional key differentiators that make Interface a leader:

  • Interface is the world’s largest producer of low profile load cells.
  • Interface makes our own self-temperature compensated strain gages from our exclusive proprietary alloy.
  • Interface load cells are creep tested to the tightest specification in the industry.
  • Interface performs more than 100,000 calibrations every year in the world’s largest calibration lab.
  • Interface LowProfile™ load cell is moment compensated to minimize sensitivity to extraneous loads.
  • Interface’s Gold Standard Calibration System is the industry gold standard’ for test and measurement.
  • Interface is the only major load cell company offering a comprehensive system for customers to calibrate their own load cells.
  • Interface LowProfile™ load cells are individually calibrated and tested through a series of performance tests before it leaves our facility.
  • Interface calibrations are NIST traceable. And our lab has A2LA accreditation for both load cell and torque sensor calibration.
  • Interface can modify and customize force measurement solutions, delivering the broadest variety of available options in the industry.

Read more about our full capabilities here.

Learn more about our dedicated team and the Interface story about a company that has long-stood the test of time. Interface is built to last.

Interface Company Brochure

Recap of Accurate Report on Calibration

Interface recently hosted an in-depth discussion on the topic of calibration.  As one of the largest calibration labs in the world for force and torque sensors, our team shared insider tips, frequently asked questions, set up techniques and best practices in the lab during this extensive calibration webinar.

The ForceLeaders seminar also covered details about various calibration grade equipment like our 1800 Platinum Standard® Calibration LowProfile® Load Cell, 1600 Gold Standard® Calibration LowProfile® Load Cell, fixtures, load frames, and calibration systems.  We also delved into topics that include instrumentation, verification frames and software.

During the event, we covered a diverse set of subjects due to the range of experiences of our attendees including the top five reasons why calibration matters, the measurement of uncertainty, identifying errors and the parameters of calibration.

You will find the recorded event Accurate Report on Calibration is available to review the technical details related to each of these important calibration subjects.

Elliot Speidell, Brian Peters and Chris Brandenburg covered a wide range of topics, including:

  • The Metrology Perspective
  • Interface Calibration Methodology: What, Why & How
  • Top 5 Reasons Why Calibration Matters
  • Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty
  • What Errors are Characterized in the Calibration Process?
  • System Calibration Considerations
  • Calibration Lab Set Up Best Practices + Tips
  • Optimization + Calibration Applications
  • Fixtures + Standard Equipment
  • Interface Calibration Services
  • Do & Don’t Tips + FAQ

To get things started, we began the event with a quick conversation about metrology, the science of measurement, which embraces both experimental and theoretical determinations at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology.

Metrology is the global network standardizing measurement units. Calibration is the action taken at each step in the metrology network.

Metrology is important to Interface because it provides the standards for controlled processes, systems, reliability, accuracy, quality and science. Calibration is the set of operations that compares the accuracy of a measuring instrument of any type, such as a load cell or torque transducer, against a recognized standard. The process of calibration includes adjusting the measuring instrument to bring it in alignment with the standard.

Why is calibration of load cells and torque transducers important?

  • All load cells are subject to performance degradation due mistreatment, drift, or aging
  • You need traceability and quality system requirements
  • Pre and post-test verification is critical for data validity
  • Even load cells manufactured to the highest standards require regular calibration

Interface calibrates every load cell and torque transducer to spec before it leaves our facility. We also provide recalibration services for all types of devices, even those we don’t manufacturer. This results in more than 100,000 calibrations every year by our trained technicians. During this event we shared valuable tips for setting up and operating a world-class calibration lab.

Best practices for calibration labs:

  • Define workspace requirements
  • Qualify measurement types and models
  • Identify suppliers
  • Select calibration grade equipment
  • Assemble lab
  • Train lab techs
  • Create certification and testing protocols
  • Define workflows
  • Utilize software for tracking assets and certificates
  • Know maintenance and recalibration schedules

The Accurate Report on Calibration recorded event is available online to watch at your convenience.

If you need help in defining the best calibration grade systems or equipment for your specific test environment, contact our application engineers.  If you need a calibration service, you can submit your request online.

Faces of Interface Featuring Tin Nguyen

Today’s Faces of Interface features a person who might possibly hold the most titles in the company, and for good reason. Tin Nguyen is our calibration engineer, manufacturing engineer and business unit manager for calibration. Tin has earned all these titles along with the important responsibility through his relentless ability to take on and excel in new tasks, as well as his desire to learn. Check out his story.

Since he was about the age of eight years old, Tin had a proficiency for learning how to design and build things. It all started growing up on his grandparent’s farm where he would theorize ways to make tools and machines around the farm easier to use or more efficient. He vowed then that when he grew up, he would find a way to build things to make life easier for people.

Tin went on to attend Arizona State University (ASU), where he received a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering and in technology in 2000. He really enjoyed the ASU engineering school experience because it was hands on and he got to work with the latest technology, preparing him for the real world. While attending school, Tin also served as an auto mechanic for racing cars to earn some extra money on the side and because he really enjoyed the work.

Tin joined Interface in September 2001. He began his career as a calibration associate in the calibration lab. After a few years in the lab, Tin was then promoted to manufacturing engineer. A year later, he was promoted to calibration supervisor followed by the calibration departments business unit manager. His success in each of these roles allowed him to retain some of his titles and work throughout the company to lend his skills and expertise.

Today, his role covers quite a bit of what we do here at Interface. His day-to-day responsibilities include developing and maintaining tooling for calibration, fixturing, improving production processes, auditing equipment, figuring out ways to reduce costs, training calibration techs, maintaining calibration standards, looking after 20 different rigs, to highlight a few. His depth of experience and expertise lends to supporting and helping the company meet the growing demands for Interface’s quality products.

What Tin enjoys so much about working at Interface and continuing to take on new roles is that he loves to learn everything there is to know about the company and serving customers. Tin noted, there are a lot of talented people around him to provide that knowledge and support. After more than 20 years with the company, Tin still feels that he has more to learn. He’s also very honored by the trust that Interface and its leadership have placed in Tin to take on all of his important roles.

In his free time, Tin loves to travel and explore the great outdoors. He enjoys hiking, camping, fishing, boating and more. And, as if he doesn’t already have enough projects in his work life, Tin is also very fond of upgrading and remodeling his home. He takes a lot of ownership over the process and will do everything that he can before hiring somebody to help.

With all the hats Tin wears, he knows Interface inside out and we’re thrilled to have him and his cross-departmental expertise as part of the Interface family! We hope you enjoyed the newest entry into our Faces of Interface and if you’re looking to learn more about our talented staff, visit our ForceLeaders feature here.